This Founding Father Will Renew Your Hope for Liberty

Dickinson recognized that the essential purpose of government was to maintain liberty against others’ predatory acts.

John Dickinson was among America’s most important founders. He was a colonial legislator, member of the Stamp Act, Continental, and Confederation Congresses, chief executive of both Delaware (by a 25 to 1 vote; his being the only opposed) and Pennsylvania, president of the 1786 Annapolis convention that led to the Constitutional Convention, and among the most informed and seasoned statesmen to attend it. Historian Forrest McDonald wrote that, but for Dickinson and a few others, “the resulting constitution would not have been ratified.” Continue reading

The Death of Academic Rigor

The notion of academic rigor has fallen on evil times. In a typical instance of continuing epistemic degradation, Donna Riley, of Purdue University’s School of Engineering Education, insists that rigor must be eliminated since rigor is a “dirty deed” fraught with “exclusionary implications for marginalized groups and marginalized ways of knowing.” It matters little, apparently, if our bridges collapse so long as “men of color and women, students with disabilities, LGBTQ+ people, first-generation and low-income students” are welcomed into the new holistic community defined by “other ways of knowing” – whatever these may be. Similarly, Rochelle Gutierrez, of the University of Illinois, fears that algebra, geometry, and math perpetuate white male privilege and discriminate against minorities. Indeed, minority under-performance is often disguised as a form of “mismatching” – that is, the fault lies with the institution for being beyond the student’s intellectual means. Clearly, the dire situation we are in can only deteriorate as the concept of excellence bites the dust and students are deliberately coaxed into pre-planned intellectual darkness. Continue reading

Tennessee voters support school Choice

A poll of Tennessee voters shows overwhelming support for more school choice options in the Volunteer State.

The poll conducted by Mason-Dixon Polling and Strategy asked 625 Tennesseans if they “support or oppose” allowing parents to use their child’s education tax dollars for a public, charter, or private school. A whopping 65 percent support it. Continue reading

The Intrusion of White Families Into Bilingual Schools

Will the growing demand for multilingual early-childhood programs push out the students these programs were designed to serve?

Lucy Nicholson ~ Reuters

Stephanie Lugardo’s second-grade classroom at Academia Antonia Alonso in Wilmington, Delaware, is bubbling. Students chatter with one another as they work, smiling and joking and wiggling in and out of their chairs. Sure—it’s an elementary-school classroom. It’s expected to exude the earnest joy of children growing into themselves. But this one is different. Smiles break out on an array of faces, and the chatter spills out in English and Spanish.
Continue reading

Why Everyone Shouldn’t Go to College

I have been in school for more than 40 years. First preschool, kindergarten, elementary school, junior high, and high school. Then a bachelor’s degree at UC Berkeley, followed by a doctoral program at Princeton. The next step was what you could call my first “real” job—as an economics professor at George Mason University.

Thanks to tenure, I have a dream job for life. Personally, I have no reason to lash out at our system of higher education. Yet a lifetime of experience, plus a quarter century of reading and reflection, has convinced me that it is a big waste of time and money. When politicians vow to send more Americans to college, I can’t help gasping, “Why? You want us to waste even more?” Continue reading

What the Catholic Church Said about the Public Schools in 1852

America is known as the “land of the free.”

Yet, technically, it forces its children to receive some type of formal education.

Compulsory education laws have been a part of the American Republic for a little over 150 years (they also existed in some Puritan settlements in colonial America). In all states, children between the ages of 6-17 (which varies by state) who have not been enrolled in a private school or completed the necessary paperwork and requirements to homeschool must be enrolled in a public school. Continue reading

New Teacher Academy provides some relief in teacher shortage

Publisher’s NOTE: The following column relates to the High school that my wife teaches for. She has not stopped working since retirement six years ago – or is it seven now? She ris more than familiar with the subject a matter and personal at the heart of what you are about to read. Arizona has a tremendous shortage of teachers – for reasons we have stated here before – maybe the following is part of the answer. ~ J.B.

Adrianne Penullar, photo by Derek Hall

As students file in to Adrianne Penullar’s general chemistry class at Westview High School, their first task is relinquishing their phones. Continue reading

Children Learn What They’re Taught

Many millennials embrace Marxism. So do their parents and grandparents

                 Karl Marx

From the millennials’ abilities will supposedly flow the wherewithal to fund “needs”: their elders‘ entitlements, debt, and ever-expanding blob of a government. Horror of horrors, polls and studies indicate that many millennials are embracing Marxism: they want somebody to fund their “needs”! Where did they learn this nonsense?

It must be those left-wing, snowflake sanctuary, social justice warrior haven, gender-bending colleges and their washed up Marxist professors. This is America, where everyone stands on their own two feet. That’s not how they were reared! Continue reading

1 in 4 Teachers Chronically Absent From Classrooms

Problem Is Three Times Worse in Traditional Schools

Empty Classroom In Elementary School. (Photo By: Education Images/UIG via Getty Images)

Teachers in traditional district schools are three times as likely to be chronically absent from the classroom as those in charter schools, meaning they are gone for more than 10 days in a typical 180-day school year, a new research paper has found. Continue reading

5 Ways Adults Can Develop Children With Strong Social and Emotional Skills

I’m a math teacher, not a counselor. I’m here to teach math,” one teacher recently told a principal I was working with in an afterschool program. The principal recounted this story while reflecting on an effort to infuse more social-emotional learning into her school.

The concept of having to “add one more thing” to overburdened teachers is nothing new. To overcome this resistance, the education field must not view SEL as a separate curriculum but instead as what it is at its core: a set of skills, competencies, and principles that inform and guide how to interact with students. That is, rather than SEL being what educators teach, it is how they teach. Continue reading

Harvard Students Explain 3 Ways Homeschooling Helped Them Succeed

If one was to name a leading institution of higher education in America, Harvard University would definitely be one of the first to come to mind. After all, anyone with the name Harvard on his resume is practically guaranteed an open door to all kinds of profitable careers. The trick, then, is to get into such a prestigious school.

In recent years, various individuals have proclaimed that their entrance into Harvard was paved by homeschooling. But what about after they get in? Are they up to the task and able to succeed? Continue reading

Bonfire of the academies: Two professors on how leftist intolerance is killing higher education

Evergreen State College’s outcast professors Heather Heying and Bret Weinstein describe how postmodern leftist intolerance is killing higher education.

At colleges and universities all over the country, students are protesting in increasingly virulent and sometimes violent ways. They demand safe spaces and trigger warnings, shouting down those with whom they disagree. It has become rote for outsiders to claim that the inmates are running the asylum; that this is analogous to Mao’s Red Guard, Germany’s brown shirts, the French Revolution’s Jacobins; and, when those being attacked are politically “left” themselves, that the Left is eating its own. These stories seem to validate every fantasy the Right ever had about the Left.

As two professors who recently resigned from positions at a college we loved, and who have always been on the progressive-left end of the political spectrum, we can say that, while none of those characterizations is exactly right, there is truth in each of them. (Continue to Full article >>>)

Oldest surviving photo of a US President is found

Grainy 1843 image of America’s sixth president, John Quincy Adams was expected to fetch up to $250,000 at auction after it was discovered by descendant of Vermont representative.

A March 1843 image of John Quincy Adams sitting is to be sold at an auction at Sotheby’s in New York, potentially going for $150,000 to $250,000

The photo has even had Emily Bierman, head of the auction house’s photographs department, call it ‘without a doubt the most important historical photo portrait to be offered at auction in the last 20 years.’ Continue reading

Florida School Ditches Common Core! Soars To Number One in State!

Mason Classical Academy dumped the Common Core program in favor of traditional teaching methods and has since jumped to the number one position in the Florida’s top schools list, according to government statistics.

The charter school in Naples, Florida, decided against forcing kids to learn the Obama endorsed Common Core method of teaching.

They were not happy with the way it deliberately dumbs down children and created unnecessary and complicated methods for working out relatively simple problems. Continue reading

INSANE: California government criminalizes teaching of trade skills to youth… all “education” must be government approved

As the United States Constitution continues to become nothing more than a dated piece of paper in the eyes of the left, the federal government continues to grow, spreading like a plague and infecting virtually every institution in American society. Sadly, America’s education system is no exception.

The liberal state of California recently passed a law requiring trade schools to deny admission to students that have not completed high school or a state-approved equivalent, meaning that the government ultimately has the final say over what young people learn and what they don’t learn. Continue reading

K-12: The Schools You Deserve

Thomas Jefferson declared: “The government you elect is the government you deserve.” Wouldn’t the same go for a school system? If you select it, you must deserve it.

Plato said an early version of what would later be attributed to Edmund Burke: “The penalty good men pay for indifference to public affairs is to be ruled by evil men.” Albert Einstein put it this way: “The world is in greater peril from those who tolerate or encourage evil than from those who actually commit it.”

In education, we have a startling amount of tolerating and encouraging. Continue reading

The Contradictions of Good Teaching

Many educators who succeed at raising test scores also fail at keeping students fulfilled

Is a good teacher one who makes students enjoy class the most or one who is strict and has high standards? And are those two types even at odds?

A new study that tries to quantify this phenomenon finds that on average, teachers who are good at raising test scores are worse at making kids happy in class. Continue reading

How a $250 Break for Teachers Explains a House-Senate Divide on Taxes

Publisher’s NOTE: The following was published by the New York Times on November 27, 2017 – hence some of the information herein is dated, but the circumstances and issues still stand. ~ J.B.

Shopping for school supplies in Burbank, Calif., in August. The House tax bill would eliminate a deduction for teachers who buy their own school supplies, while the Senate version would double it. – Credit Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg

November 27, 2017 ~ For Carrie Uffelman Brake, planning for next school year begins before the current one ends.

The shopping starts as early as April, when she gets the list of students who will be in her third grade classroom in rural Tennessee the following fall. If boys outnumber girls, she will need extra toys to keep hyperactive hands busy. If it is a group of struggling readers, she will need double the number of books. Continue reading

West Valley feeling pinch of teacher shortage

Publisher’s NOTE: The ‘West Valley’ is incorporate of the western suburbs of Phoenix, Arizona. As we have previously published, Arizona is one of the states in this country, that has an intense shortage of teachers – but we are not the only state. What you are about to read is a more intense extension of the problem. ~ J.B.

West Valley View photo by Jordan Christopher

When Liza Lawson began teaching at La Joya Community High School in 2007, she was aware of the struggles new teachers typically faced.

She was prepared for the 85-hour work weeks, large class sizes and weekends spent tutoring or planning lessons. The burnout didn’t set in until years later. Continue reading