Justice and Liberty Have No Better Spokesman than Cicero

Cicero merits renewed attention

John Adams said of Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 BCE) that “All ages of the world have not produced a greater statesman and philosopher combined.” Anthony Everitt called him an “architect of constitutions that still govern our lives.” Thomas Jefferson said the Declaration of Independence was based on “the elementary books of public right, as Aristotle, Cicero, Locke, Sidney, etc.” Continue reading

Honor for teacher who read transgender book to kindergarteners

A controversial charter school teacher is back in the news, and one organization says it should send a red flag to parents everywhere.

Kaelin Swaney has been named “Teacher of the Year” by the California Charter Schools Association. Swaney is the kindergarten teacher at Rocklin Academy Gateway who made headlines last year when she read a book about a transgender child to her students before one of them left the class, changed clothing, then returned as part of an effort to reveal that student’s “true gender.” Continue reading

Parents Stage Walkout Over Planned Parenthood’s Graphic, Violent Sex Ed in Public Schools

Sex education in public schools has gone off the deep end. Gone are the days of handing out birth control and practicing putting condoms on bananas. These days your kid is more likely to come away from school with more sexually deviant knowledge than single gay dudes in New York City have thanks to Planned Parenthood’s comprehensive sex ed program that has somehow made it into public school curriculums. These programs teach dangerous and violent practices like BDSM, asphyxiation, gender-bending, anal sex, and let’s not forget “rimming,” which can saddle your kid with nasty parasitic infections. Continue reading

Linda Brown, who as a little girl was at the center of the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court decision, has died at age 76

The Topeka girl was just nine years old when her father Oliver Brown tried to enroll her at Sumner Elementary School, an all white school in 1951.

When the school refused to allow the black pupil to enroll, her father sued the Topeka Board of Education.

The lawsuit led to the famous 1954 Supreme Court case of Brown v. Board of Education. Linda’s father was lead plaintiff in the case that saw the Supreme Court end school segregation.

Linda Brown died Sunday afternoon at the Peaceful Rest Funeral Chapel in Topeka.

Her sister, Cheryl Brown Henderson, founding president of The Brown Foundation, confirmed the death to The Topeka Capital-Journal. Continue reading

Two teachers go to Dutch Bros…

… and plan a sick-out that closes 9 Arizona schools

(Photo: Tom Tingle/The Republic)

Wednesday’s historic teacher sick-out that closed down nine Arizona elementary schools started with two teachers venting their usual frustrations on a Dutch Bros. Coffee run the morning before.

Kassandra Dominguez, a first-grade teacher at Sunset Ridge Elementary School in Glendale, told her colleague, kindergarten teacher Jackie Lake, that she had spent $45 out her own pocket buying materials for a parent event.

Dominguez spent the money because she cares about her students, but the amount was significant considering her annual earnings: $38,600 for a teacher who has a master’s degree and five years’ experience in the classroom and teaching abroad. Continue reading

Digital School Days

Classroom of the future

The biggest trend I see for the future is the meltdown of governments at all levels combined with a decentralizing, individual-empowering exponential growth in technology. States, in other words, will self-destruct while people get smarter, stronger, healthier, and freer — they will get a lot smarter, a lot stronger, a lot healthier and from this, freedom from the state will be a natural evolution.

There will be efforts to resurrect states but the attempts will fail. Too many people will recognize the futility of trying to secure their well-being under a monopoly form of government — a government that threatens violence against nonviolent individuals such as taxpayers. As social organizations, states are headed for extinction while technology, in spite of its downsides, will be our liberator. Continue reading

New York to Nix Literacy Tests for Teachers because too many Minorities Are Failing

The story is over a year old, but the consequences will last a lifetime. ~ Ed.

Image Credit: Dean Jarvey bit.ly/1ryPA8o

Should teachers be able to pass a basic literacy test before they set foot in a classroom?

One would think that the answer to that question would be a solid yes. After all, it seems obvious that the ability to understand and communicate through reading and writing is essential to any teacher regardless of the subject in which he teaches. Continue reading

A Little More Jayhawker History…

…your school books inadvertently forgot to mention

I’ve found it interesting, over the years, as I have perused the internet out of curiosity to see what sites it might contain that deal with Yankee/Marxist atrocities in Missouri before and during the War of Northern Aggression, the first sites that usually pop up in search engines mostly seem to deal with Lawrence, Kansas.

Could you say there was Yankee/Marxist bias on the internet? Heavens to Abigail–who would ever have thunk it??? Continue reading

Free Lunch: OUR Tax Dollars at Work

What you are about to read is dated. How old is it? Who knows – but it is indicative of what is wrong in not only the Educational field – but at all levels of government itself. In the following, an English teacher helps to explain one area that looms large over California’s educational crisis. This English teacher has phrased it the best I’ve seen yet. This should make everyone think, be you Democrat, Republican or Independent.~ Ed.

900 teachers were recently laid off from the Los Angeles Unified School District. They were (at the time) $650,000 over their annual budget.

From a California school teacher – – –

“As you listen to the news about the student protests over illegal immigration, there are some things that you should be aware of.

I am in charge of the English-as-a-second-language department at a large southern California high school which is designated a Title 1 school, meaning that its students average lower socioeconomic and income levels.

Most of the schools you are hearing about, South Gate High, Bell Gardens, Huntington Park , etc.. where these students are protesting, are also Title 1 schools. Continue reading

Thomas Paine ~ Liberty’s Hated Torchbearer

Thomas Paine

When Thomas Paine’s ship pulled into Baltimore harbor on October 30, 1802, a large gathering of friends and admirers were waiting at dockside to welcome him back. Others stood by as well, some filled with loathing, merely to observe a famous figure. Since leaving the United States in 1787 to find a builder for his iron bridge, Paine had authored some of the most incendiary tracts of the 18th century, had been imprisoned and narrowly escaped Robespierre’s guillotine, and was widely reported to be a drunk and an atheist. Continue reading

Allsup: Children of the Light ~ a story for children

Recently, I was asked whether I had written any stories appropriate for the second grade block in a Waldorf school or homeschool that features tales about exemplary people. I wrote this story and told it before the November festival of Martinmas which is a time when the year turns toward outer darkness and we are reminded of the importance of sharing the inner light of compassion. This story could be told, however, at any time of year. In fact, as I add this to the Growing Children blog in 2018, we have just experienced a great March Storm here on Cape Cod complete with 90 mile an hour winds and high seas that poured into our seaside villages. It is at such difficult times that we can be inspired by the best in people. ~ Kim
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Why North Carolina thinks $200 per K-3 teacher will help all kids learn to read

Author LeUyen Pham reads one of her books to second graders at Westerly Hills Elementary in Charlotte. John D. Simmons Observer file photo

State Superintendent Mark Johnson announced a $4.8 million plan to buy books, digital subscriptions and other reading aids for 479,000 K-3 students across North Carolina.

The allotment comes to $200 per teacher in those grades and will be distributed this month to school districts and charter schools. It’s part of North Carolina’s Read to Achieve program, a long-running quest to improve reading that has so far fallen short. Continue reading

There Are Three Times as Many Latino Students as Teachers in America

Two New Reports Show Why That’s Bad for Both

Latino teachers are eager to serve as role models and cultural stewards, but they feel their extra work as interpreters for Spanish-speaking families is undervalued, according to a new report from the Education Trust. Many see the additional responsibilities of community outreach as a second job they are expected to perform.

The report comprises responses from 90 Latino teachers in five states (New Jersey, North Carolina, Florida, Texas, and California) about the complexities of teaching Latino students, as well as their relationships with white colleagues and administrators, and their hopes for professional advancement. Continue reading

Benson: “Maryland, my (home schooling) Maryland

Home schooling is one of those things that scares the living daylights out of the Educational Establishment and the Deep State. Home schooling, and Christian education in general tend to be areas where the participants do not always (usually) accept the Establishment version of history and/or politics.

From time to time, as they feel they can get away with it, the “change agents” in the educational bureaucracy seek to remedy this situation by trying to find reasons to enforce new controls that will give them more power and control over home schooling, its curriculums, and its participants. Continue reading

School Daze…

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos struggles to answer basic questions about education on ’60 Minutes’ – and White House isn’t sure Trump was able to make it through the whole interview

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos struggled her way through an interview with ’60 Minutes’ as she tried to pitch her school choice positions and admitted she hadn’t deliberately visited underperforming schools. Continue reading

Let ‘Em Out! The Many Benefits of Outdoor Play In Kindergarten

Waldkindergartens, an all-outdoor kindergarten in Switzerland/Rona RIchter

For the typical American kindergartner, unstructured free play during the school day consists of 20 to 30 minutes of recess, and perhaps some time at indoor “stations” — perhaps creating with building blocks, costumes, or musical instruments. But what if there was more? What if the answer to “what did you do in school today?” was, “I climbed a tree, played in the mud, built a fire”?

That is exactly the kind of learning going on in the Swiss Waldkindergartens, or forest kindergartens, where children ages four to seven spend all of their school days playing outdoors, no matter the weather. With no explicit math or literacy taught until first grade, the Swiss have no set goals for kindergartners beyond a few measurements, like using scissors and writing one’s own name. They instead have chosen to focus on the social interaction and emotional well-being found in free play. Continue reading

Frederick Douglass and a Constitution for all

Freedom is not free, nor is it easy. The alternative to freedom is tyranny.

                       Frederick Douglas ~ American

President Trump has signed into law bipartisan legislation establishing the Frederick Douglass Bicentennial Commission to celebrate Douglass’ life and work. I have been honored to be appointed, along with Dr. Alveda King, niece of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and others, to this commission.

Born into slavery 200 years ago, Douglass taught himself to read and write, escaped to freedom and became an anti-slavery and human rights activist, newspaper publisher and advisor to presidents. Continue reading