Category Archives: Village of the Damned

The complete breakdown of America’s government controlled education system through indoctrination and Socialism. Our children have become truly ‘damned’ and will have little chance to truly succeed in this nation – UNLESS – the system can be overturned.

How About the Rest of the Story?

The following column was originally posted by Kettle Moraine Publications on October 3, 2012. It is quite probable that any embedded links may no longer be active. By republishing these columns from our archives, we hope to establish and focus on the pattern of our declining education system ~ Ed.

Parents and teachers have a daunting responsibility. And one of their responsibilities is to promote critical thinking in the children entrusted to their care. This entails guiding children through careful consideration of all the facets of a reality or issue. This critical endeavor, therefore, requires, in age-appropriate fashion, that the entire picture be provided. Such is not what seems to have happened recently in a civics presentation at Mary Ellen Henderson Middle School in Falls Church City, Va. And, for all we know, this may not be an uncommon occurrence in many of our schools. Continue reading

John Dewey: Fraud

The following column was originally posted by Kettle Moraine Publications on October 1, 2012. It is quite probable that embedded links may no longer be active. ~ Ed.

John Dewey

It is generally agreed that John Dewey (1859-1952) is the Father of American Education and the Greatest American Educator Ever.

The problem with the labels is that John Dewey, albeit a genius, was not an educator in the sense that most people use this word. He was not interested in teaching as most people understand that term, as for example in the statement “I teach French.”

Dewey was not primarily concerned with teaching new information. He was concerned with inculcating new attitudes. Continue reading

Inside a Public School Social Justice Factory

Minnesota public school forcing KINDERGARTEN students to study ‘WHITE privilege’

The city of Edina has changed the way it approaches public education, putting social justice above learning. The results will shock you.

For decades, the public schools of Edina, Minnesota, were the gold standard among the state’s school districts. Edina is an upscale suburb of Minneapolis, but virtually overnight, its reputation has changed. Academic rigor is unraveling, high school reading and math test scores are sliding, and students increasingly fear bullying and persecution. Continue reading

Does Common Core Ask Too Much of Kindergarten Readers?

Sandwiched between preschool and first grade, kindergarteners often start school at very different stages of development depending on their exposure to preschool, home environments and biology. For states adopting Common Core, the standards apply to kindergarten, laying out what students should be able to do by the end of the grade.* Kindergartners are expected to know basic phonics and word recognition as well as read beginner texts, skills some childhood development experts argue are developmentally inappropriate. Continue reading

K-12: Patterns of Deception

Mary McCarthy and Lillian Hellman, both famous literary left-wingers, had a famous feud. McCarthy dared to proclaim that Hellman was a Truly Big Liar.

When Dick Cavett asked (in 1979) what was so “dishonest” about Hellman, McCarthy snapped, “Everything. I once said in an interview that every word she writes is a lie, including ‘and’ and ‘the.'”

These entertaining charges make more sense when we consider that Lillian Hellman was “an ardent leftist,” according to leftist PBS. Continue reading

Are Schools Flunking Their Primary Purpose?

Image Credit: bradburyjason bit.ly/1iowB8m

In a recent Washington Post article, author Sarah Hamaker described how many young adults no longer know how to do simple, basic skills:

Colleges and employers alike are reporting that young people can’t do life’s most basic tasks. With all of our emphasis on academics and what it takes to get into college, essential life skills, such as how to do laundry, balance a checking account or cook a meal, have been overlooked.
Continue reading

Middle School Reading Lists 100 Years Ago vs. Today

I recently dug up a 1908 curriculum manual in the Minnesota Historical Society archives. It provided instructions on everything from teacher deportment to recommended literature lists for various grades. As a book lover, I was especially interested in the latter!

With the exception of a few textbook-like anthologies, the chart below lists the recommended reading material for Minnesota 7th and 8th graders in 1908: Continue reading

Sponsor a Millennial TODAY!

“44% of Millennials would prefer to live under a socialist system than a capitalist one. This is more than a little puzzling at a time when socialism has proved a catastrophic failure in its remaining strongholds in Venezuela, North Korea and Cuba.“

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The Best Way to Get Boys Reading

While at a gathering of friends several months ago, I stopped to chat for a few minutes with a twelve-year-old boy whom I’ll call Davy.

Although the youngest in a family of all girls, I knew Davy was all boy. He liked guns and animals and all manner of typical boy subjects. Because of this, I was delighted to see that he was sitting there reading a book, an activity that doesn’t seem to be a popular pastime with most of the male sex. Continue reading

The Death of Academic Rigor

The notion of academic rigor has fallen on evil times. In a typical instance of continuing epistemic degradation, Donna Riley, of Purdue University’s School of Engineering Education, insists that rigor must be eliminated since rigor is a “dirty deed” fraught with “exclusionary implications for marginalized groups and marginalized ways of knowing.” It matters little, apparently, if our bridges collapse so long as “men of color and women, students with disabilities, LGBTQ+ people, first-generation and low-income students” are welcomed into the new holistic community defined by “other ways of knowing” – whatever these may be. Similarly, Rochelle Gutierrez, of the University of Illinois, fears that algebra, geometry, and math perpetuate white male privilege and discriminate against minorities. Indeed, minority under-performance is often disguised as a form of “mismatching” – that is, the fault lies with the institution for being beyond the student’s intellectual means. Clearly, the dire situation we are in can only deteriorate as the concept of excellence bites the dust and students are deliberately coaxed into pre-planned intellectual darkness. Continue reading

Why Everyone Shouldn’t Go to College

I have been in school for more than 40 years. First preschool, kindergarten, elementary school, junior high, and high school. Then a bachelor’s degree at UC Berkeley, followed by a doctoral program at Princeton. The next step was what you could call my first “real” job—as an economics professor at George Mason University.

Thanks to tenure, I have a dream job for life. Personally, I have no reason to lash out at our system of higher education. Yet a lifetime of experience, plus a quarter century of reading and reflection, has convinced me that it is a big waste of time and money. When politicians vow to send more Americans to college, I can’t help gasping, “Why? You want us to waste even more?” Continue reading

Children Learn What They’re Taught

Many millennials embrace Marxism. So do their parents and grandparents

                 Karl Marx

From the millennials’ abilities will supposedly flow the wherewithal to fund “needs”: their elders‘ entitlements, debt, and ever-expanding blob of a government. Horror of horrors, polls and studies indicate that many millennials are embracing Marxism: they want somebody to fund their “needs”! Where did they learn this nonsense?

It must be those left-wing, snowflake sanctuary, social justice warrior haven, gender-bending colleges and their washed up Marxist professors. This is America, where everyone stands on their own two feet. That’s not how they were reared! Continue reading

1 in 4 Teachers Chronically Absent From Classrooms

Problem Is Three Times Worse in Traditional Schools

Empty Classroom In Elementary School. (Photo By: Education Images/UIG via Getty Images)

Teachers in traditional district schools are three times as likely to be chronically absent from the classroom as those in charter schools, meaning they are gone for more than 10 days in a typical 180-day school year, a new research paper has found. Continue reading

Bonfire of the academies: Two professors on how leftist intolerance is killing higher education

Evergreen State College’s outcast professors Heather Heying and Bret Weinstein describe how postmodern leftist intolerance is killing higher education.

At colleges and universities all over the country, students are protesting in increasingly virulent and sometimes violent ways. They demand safe spaces and trigger warnings, shouting down those with whom they disagree. It has become rote for outsiders to claim that the inmates are running the asylum; that this is analogous to Mao’s Red Guard, Germany’s brown shirts, the French Revolution’s Jacobins; and, when those being attacked are politically “left” themselves, that the Left is eating its own. These stories seem to validate every fantasy the Right ever had about the Left.

As two professors who recently resigned from positions at a college we loved, and who have always been on the progressive-left end of the political spectrum, we can say that, while none of those characterizations is exactly right, there is truth in each of them. (Continue to Full article >>>)

K-12: The Schools You Deserve

Thomas Jefferson declared: “The government you elect is the government you deserve.” Wouldn’t the same go for a school system? If you select it, you must deserve it.

Plato said an early version of what would later be attributed to Edmund Burke: “The penalty good men pay for indifference to public affairs is to be ruled by evil men.” Albert Einstein put it this way: “The world is in greater peril from those who tolerate or encourage evil than from those who actually commit it.”

In education, we have a startling amount of tolerating and encouraging. Continue reading

West Valley feeling pinch of teacher shortage

Publisher’s NOTE: The ‘West Valley’ is incorporate of the western suburbs of Phoenix, Arizona. As we have previously published, Arizona is one of the states in this country, that has an intense shortage of teachers – but we are not the only state. What you are about to read is a more intense extension of the problem. ~ J.B.

West Valley View photo by Jordan Christopher

When Liza Lawson began teaching at La Joya Community High School in 2007, she was aware of the struggles new teachers typically faced.

She was prepared for the 85-hour work weeks, large class sizes and weekends spent tutoring or planning lessons. The burnout didn’t set in until years later. Continue reading

California Is Being Sued Because So Few Of Their Public School Children Can Read

Lil Johnny can’t read…

At one elementary school in California, 96 percent of the students are not proficient in either English or math. How is that even possible? Unfortunately, the more the federal government gets involved in education, the worse it seems to get. At one time the United States had the greatest system of public education on the entire planet, but these days we only seem to make headlines when news comes out about how poorly we are doing. This has been a hot button issue for me for a long time, but even I was surprised when I learned that the state of California is actually being sued because so few of their public school children can read… Continue reading

Texas School ‘Cures’ ADHD Doing One Change

ADD and ADHD are both constantly touted by parents and teachers as the reasoning behind why children are unable to focus. And often times, the “cure” seems to be a slew of pharmaceutical medications that numb the children to their surroundings.

Rarely is the cure ever to cut down on sugar or to consider that a child’s brain and focus simply isn’t fully developed. And never has the cure been enacting a program that extends the amount of time kids have recess. (Continue to full story…)

Almost Every Graduate of DC High School Was Truant, Yet All Were Accepted to College

The majority of graduating students at a Washington, D.C. high school did not attend more than six weeks of high school, but still managed to get into college, an investigation into the students’ records found.

NPR and WAMU looked into the seniors who graduated from Ballou High School in 2017, a school located in a poverty stricken area of the nation’s capital, to see how much school the graduating students missed. Ballou High School was previously heavily praised for all students in its senior class getting into college. Continue reading