Category Archives: Through Benson’s Eyes

Al Benson Jr.is a highly respected scholar and writer and has graciously allowed Kettle Moraine, Ltd. to reprint his works. We are glad to have his involvement with this monumental project.

Benson: Texas

When I was a kid I was fascinated by the map of the United States (and Confederate States). Having grown up in the East, the idea of Texas, way out west, fascinated me and I wanted to see it, to go there, to experience it myself. Looking at photos is one thing. Seeing something in real life, being there and experiencing it is something else.

You can look at a million pictures of the Grand Canyon and that’s great—but being there, even if only once, and standing there yourself on the South Rim and looking at it beats all the photos in the world.

It’s the same thing with Texas. The photos are great, but the personal experience is infinitely better. Continue reading

Benson: Oklahoma Reminiscences

Recently, I picked up a book at one of the local libraries called Killers of the Flower Moon—The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI, written by a David Grann. Mr. Grann is a staff writer at the New Yorker so there would probably be some things he and I would not agree on politically, but he did write an interesting book about how a group of people in Osage County, Oklahoma killed off several Osage Indians in order to get the headrights to their oil leases and make lots and lots of money from that.

It interested me because, back in the late 1960s I had briefly lived in Osage County, Oklahoma, which had been the old Osage Indian reservation. It is still listed that way on some maps.

My Dad had sold his home in the East and bought a trailer and we went West, so wherever we set the trailer up at night, that was home, at least for that night. We got as far as central New Mexico, looking for work, of which there was very little. At the same time I was trying to make a little selling my paintings. The art market in New Mexico was pretty competitive and I wasn’t nearly as good as most of those artists around Taos and Santa Fe, so we headed back east from there. Continue reading

A Little More Jayhawker History…

…your school books inadvertently forgot to mention

I’ve found it interesting, over the years, as I have perused the internet out of curiosity to see what sites it might contain that deal with Yankee/Marxist atrocities in Missouri before and during the War of Northern Aggression, the first sites that usually pop up in search engines mostly seem to deal with Lawrence, Kansas.

Could you say there was Yankee/Marxist bias on the internet? Heavens to Abigail–who would ever have thunk it??? Continue reading

Benson: “Maryland, my (home schooling) Maryland

Home schooling is one of those things that scares the living daylights out of the Educational Establishment and the Deep State. Home schooling, and Christian education in general tend to be areas where the participants do not always (usually) accept the Establishment version of history and/or politics.

From time to time, as they feel they can get away with it, the “change agents” in the educational bureaucracy seek to remedy this situation by trying to find reasons to enforce new controls that will give them more power and control over home schooling, its curriculums, and its participants. Continue reading

Belated Birthday Comments on Lincoln the Empire Builder

Well, we are now into February–the beginning of Black History Month, which should end sometime around the latter part of Spring. Yesterday was Abraham Lincoln’s birthday, with all the attendant legends and myths posing as history that always accompany that. As always we will be fed all the historical bovine fertilizer that goes along with that notable event.

This brief commentary would normally have been posted on the “Great Emancipator’s” birthday. I roughed it out the previous evening, only to discover that, when I went to print it off, the printer attached to my computer had suddenly developed a case of IDS (ink deficiency syndrome). Having been able to obtain another print cartridge late on the day of his birth I am now posting this, but the date on it will be tomorrow, the 13th. In this case a day doesn’t make that much difference, seeing that we all have already been treated to 150 plus years of historic swill. Continue reading

How “History” Professors View the “Civil War”

CLICK on Image

Many who will read this are already aware of how our current crop of “historians”–so called, view the War of Northern Aggression. However, some who read it may not be all that aware, and so this is written for those unaware ones who still labor under the naive delusion that the War was fought over slavery and that communism did not rear its ugly head in America until at least the 1930s. Well, it did rear its ugly head in the 30s–but it was the 1830s, not the 1930s. By the 1930s communism was already well established here. It’s just that no one bothered to inform the American public.

I spend considerable time on the internet scrounging around for information in those areas that concern me, and one of those areas is the record of communist and socialist infiltration in this country, both in the 19th and 20th centuries. Continue reading

National Education: It Has Always Been About “Reconstructing” Southern Culture

                     John Chodes

In his book Segregation–Federal Policy or Racism (Shotwell Publishing, Columbia, South Carolina) author John Chodes noted, on page 53 that: “In 1867, a small agency was created by Congress. It was called the Bureau of Education. It consisted of only five employees: a supervisor and four clerks, ‘to collect such statistics and facts as shall show the condition and progress of education in the several states and territories…as shall aid the people of the United States in the establishment and maintenance of efficient school systems, and otherwise promote the cause of education throughout the country.

From this miniscule beginning, over time, the Bureau of Education became a gigantic department, nationalizing, controlling, and separating black and white primary and secondary schools by administering the Morrill colleges and absorbing the Freedmen’s Bureau schools into its own bureaucracy.”

We have all been led to believe that the federal Department of Education didn’t happen until Jimmy Carter brought it in during his one-term presidency as payback to the National Education Association for their support of him. Actually, it seems that all Carter did was to support the most recent manifestation of something that had really been around, in one form or another, for a very long time. Continue reading

Education Is “Reconstruction” ~ Even Today!

In his informative book Segregation–Federal Policy or Racism, author John Chodes has some interesting information in chapter 6, which he entitles The Freedmen’s Bureau: Segregation for Black Education. In this chapter he notes that the whole concept of segregation was promoted so that blacks could be “educated” (radicalized) separately from whites. This was a kind of master plan to promote class hatred between the races. Look at it this way–one of the reasons for the War of Northern Aggression was not to free the slaves, but rather to transfer ownership from private hands to federal hands. From private hands to the Freedmen’s Bureau!

Chodes notes how the federal government was, even in the 1860s, messing around with federal control of and aid for education. The foolish idea of public, or government, schools being “ours” or somehow belonging to the people, is and has been the prevalent myth, propagated on the public at large so they will not realize that this leviathan institution was made and directed from Washington from day one. This is something we have got to get through our heads! These really were and are Government Schools!
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Segregation Was Not Southern Racism – It Was Federal Policy

I have just received an informative little book that deals with a lot of material folks will never see in their “history” books, but need to be aware of, especially here in the South. This book was written by John Chodes of New York City and published by Shotwell Publishing in Columbia, South Carolina.

The title of the book is Segregation Federal Policy or Racism? And Mr. Chodes explains why it was federal policy instead of Southern racism. He starts out by dealing with a subject I have written about on and off for years, but which most people simply fail to grasp–that “reconstructiondid not end in the South after the Yankee/Marxist troops departed–it just continued under other names and it continues right down to our day. The current riots in Charlottesville, Virginia are a prime example of how “reconstruction” continues to work in our day. Continue reading

Conclusion: Why Our Kids Never Went To Pubic School

As my wife and I settled into the concept of home schooling we found that we needed some sort of structured curriculum that we could be comfortable with. Even in the late 1980s there were quite a few home school curriculum out there, though probably not as many as today. One of our daughter’s friends, one time, commented to us “You guys home schooled before home schooling was cool.” I hadn’t thought of it that way but I guess she was right. In 1986 it hadn’t been all that long since people in some states had had their kids removed out of their homes because they refused to put them in public schools. After all, for many officious bureaucrats Government schools were the sacred cows of the hour.

So my wife and I started attending home school book fairs and conventions when we could get to them. We started checking out books and listening to various speakers.

One thing I found with various home school curriculum was that the selection of history books was, for me, somewhat discouraging in the main, and the same held true for books I saw on government. Some of the books I saw at fairs looked pretty much like government school material with a few Bible verses sprinkled over it–just enough to make them palatable to home school families that didn’t know an awful lot of history (and weren’t likely to learn much with some of these books). Continue reading

Part 4: Why Our Kids Never Went To Public School

The reactions to our decision to home school our kids were fairly quick and followed certain patterns. A couple of folks decided that, as long as we were going to do this, they could help us out by giving us lists of books we should get and make sure our kids read. I recall two such lists, if I remember correctly. I did look over the lists to see what they had.

Interestingly enough, one of the books near the top of both lists was Catcher in the Rye. When I had worked at a college back in the East, many of the kids I knew there had that one as required reading, so I had a chance back then to browse through it on several occasions. Now maybe it’s just that I am old fashioned, but my first reaction to seeing that on both lists was “I don’t want our kids reading that!” Maybe some of you all have read that one and don’t think it was as questionable as I did. There were several other offerings on both lists that I frowned at. There wasn’t an awful lot on either list that I wanted our kids messing with. Now our kids were both readers and we bought them books when we could afford to and they read and reread many of them until the covers literally fell off them. We bought them C. S. Lewis’ Chronicles of Narnia series and they read those until they were literally falling apart. I realize some folks disagree with some of Lewis’ materials, but it was a lot better than some of what was out there. Anyway, the book lists were a flop. Continue reading

Part 3: Why Our Kids Never Went To Pubic School

As I previously noted, it was not until we moved to Indiana that I grasped why most evangelical folks would not object to nor protest what went on in government schools.

In Indiana we found and attended an evangelical Presbyterian church because it was the only Reformed church we could find in the immediate area. We found a Christian school for our son to enter. Our daughter would not be ready for school for another year yet. Our son had previously been in a Baptist school in West Virginia. The new school in Indiana wasn’t everything we could have hoped for but it was still better than a government school. At least we felt that way–many of the folks in the church we attended were not quite sure of that. Just about all the families that attended this church had their kids in government schools, which they were quite satisfied with. And they thought our kids would be much better off in a government school than in a Christian school. I hope, at this point, no one tries to tell me the Christian faith in this country hasn’t been tampered with. Continue reading

Part 2: Why our kids never went to public school

Regarding the situation in Kanawha County, West Virginia from 1974-76, I have several observations that were clinchers for my wife and I as to why our kids would never cross the threshold of a government school building.

While in West Virginia, my brother and I attended quite a few school board meetings for Kanawha County, which were held in Charleston. Any time we were able to go, the school board meetings always ended up being “standing room only” affairs. If you wanted a seat you got there early. People, once the textbook protest started, showed up for school board meetings because they felt it was a chance to express their frustration at what the school system was trying for force on their kids. Little did they realize at the time, to paraphrase a saying used during the global warming scam, “the agenda is already settled.” And some of the school board members that spoke at these meetings were, shall we say, slightly less than candid. You always got straight, honest answers from Alice Moore. From some of the others it was a toss-up. Continue reading

Benson: Why Our Kids Never Went To Public School

In the main filing cabinet in my office I have three bulging folders of material collected over the years from the early 1970s until now. These three folders contain all manner of material I have collected or people have sent me about the ongoing aberrations that take place in what all thinking people realize is our government school system. It’s not a “public” school system; it’s a government school system. This material comes from all over the country. Some of this stuff would really singe your eyeballs, and if you are like me, you can’t read more than a little of it at a time without getting really ticked off. What some government school systems do to our kids is nothing short of criminal.

I have come to the conclusion, after over forty years of keeping tabs on this kind of thing, that these aberrations are what government education in this country is really all about. When I say that I am not indicting everyone who has ever taught in a government school. We have a niece in Illinois that teaches in one. She’d much rather teach in a Christian school, but she can’t find one in her area that pays a living wage so she does what she has to to survive. Continue reading

And You Thought They Only Vandalized Confederate Monuments and Graves (so you didn’t say anything)

What has transpired over the past year since Al Benson Jr. wrote the following piece, is appalling – as it should be – to ALL Americans. We have taken the liberty to open with a modified rendering of the writings by the great Martin Niemöller. We find it more fitting today than one year ago. ~ J.B.

First the came for the Media in order to control the minds of the people, and I did not speak out — because I was not a newspaperman or writer

Then they came for the cemeteries up North, and I did not speak out — because I was not from the North.

Then they came for the Confederate Memorials and cemeteries, and I did not speak out —
because I was not from the South.

Then they came for the Memorials and Statues and papers of our founding, and I did not speak out — because I cared not for the nations’ past.

Then they came for America and there was no one left to speak for her.

You can tell that the history destroyers had a busy couple weeks during the end of May, and it didn’t all happen in Dixie.

I read three separate articles June 1st about vandalism in cemeteries–all in the North. In Dixie we have grown used to this sort of thing. There are ugly people down here that, in some twisted way, seem to think they are doing humanity a service if they vandalize and destroy anything they remotely perceive as being “Confederate.” They remind me of those that Jesus spoke of in Scripture when he talked about those that would kill Christians and think they were doing God a service. Such is their “contribution” to humanity–it’s all they really know how to do. Should they somehow end up holding an intelligent position on anything they really can’t debate it with any genuine opposition, so they destroy what they hate because they can’t legitimately defend what they love–which in many cases, is indefensible.
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Benson: Socialist Teachers Unions

The NEA – the Ultimate Trojan Horse

The National Education Association meets every year for a big national convention in some city or other and teachers from all over the country show up for this event.

An agenda is usually presented showing all the things nationally that the NEA is either for or against. In the past several years they have presented agendas that Hugo Chavez, Marxist dictator of Venezuela, would love. Many of the issues they choose to address have little or nothing to do with education, but everything to do with their leftist worldview.

While many have heard of the NEA they don’t have any idea of how long it has been around or what it really does, only that many of their kids’ teachers belong to it, and the compliant media, when it reports on NEA conventions, is not about to give out anymore real information than it has to. In all fairness to public school teachers, there are some that are not in favor of what this “teachers union” does, but their opposition is generally ignored or ridiculed. Continue reading

Funding Public Education in Chicago

Over the years, as most who read my stuff will testify, I have followed what goes on in the vaunted, so-called “halls of education” in this country, particularly when those halls are located in public school buildings. Some pretty far-out things have happened in this country in the name of public education, but what I am about to comment on here may be the most expensive.

I came across a blog spot yesterday that had an article on it datelined May 25, 2017. The headline asked this question: “Why Does the Chicago Public School System have $9 Billion Dept With Only 381,000 Students?” When I first read it I couldn’t believe I hadn’t misread it. I thought it should have been $9 million, so I went back and reread it. It was $9 billion. Simply amazing! The article started off: “Chicago public schools will look to borrow $900 million in the coming weeks adding to the district’s $9 billion dept–but it remains unclear if anyone will actually give them all the money. The loans are $500 million more than Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s office announced last week when a financial rescue plan was outlined….District officials told board members Wednesday that the district would likely ‘just run out of money’ if it didn’t take out these loans.Continue reading

Good News From Alabama After New Orleans’ Political Correctness

Many of us have watched, almost dumbstruck, at the rampant cultural genocide being displayed in New Orleans. The cultural Marxists there, from the mayor on down, have simply run amuck, basically doing what they wanted the way they wanted. To label them as culture destroyers is almost too charitable. I am sure that, along with myself, many others would describe their activities and personalities in language that I would hesitate to have reproduced in this article.

Their execrable attempts at the total destruction of Southern and Confederate history and heritage almost border on the insane–but then, they are cultural Marxists, so I guess that is par for the course. Continue reading

Compassionate Communism For the Kiddies

‘Lovable little revolutionaries’ teach children communism is ‘not that hard’

Years ago I read an article by William Lind in which he labeled many of America’s colleges as “little ivy-covered North Koreas.” Having had some experience with colleges, I have to say honestly, that Mr. Lind’s description is not all that far off. He knew whereof he spoke.

I recall a college on the East Coast (and some of my readers will know about this) that, back in 1970, invited a “community organizer” (that title ring any bells?) to come in during a special session they had for students in early January of that year, supposedly to help students “solve their problems.” It turned out, thanks to a good bit of exposure by a pastor who had a local radio program there that the public was able to find out that this “community organizer” was, in fact, a well-known and identified Communist Party member who was there, basically, to indoctrinate the students. Naturally the parents of the students were not informed of this man’s Leftist connections and when the pastor exposed them on his radio broadcast, every day for about a week, it was truly a revelation to most folks. Then, someone who had access to the school’s mailing list sent a letter to several of the parents detailing this man’s Communist connections. And this wasn’t “fake news”–the pastor had the goods on this turkey. Unfortunately this sort of thing, to one degree or another, is very typical of American colleges and universities. Parents need to be really careful about where they enroll their kids in college. All that seems to glitter ain’t necessarily gold! Continue reading

Do The Leftists Control Public Education In This Country? You’d Better Believe It!

Just a couple days ago I read an excellent article by David Risselada. Among other things, Mr. Risselada said: “Finally, after eight years of governance by a left wing radical intent on turning our nation upside down, a new President is at the helm.” That’s a perfect description of what Comrade Obama did during his tenure in office. Mr. Risselada went on to comment briefly on some of Trump’s cabinet picks, both good and questionable, and then he came to Betsy DeVos, who is Mr. Trump’s choice to head the Department of Education–the department both us and our kids would be better off without.

In commenting on Mrs. DeVos he noted her endorsement of school choice (an interesting proposition that has two sides) and her opposition to Common Core. That opposition, at least, is a step in the right direction. Continue reading