Category Archives: FED-ucation

The history and results of Government Lobbying and it’s effects on the modern education system in America into the 21st Century

Music

You can cut the arts all you want, sooner or later these kids won’t have anything to read or write about.” ~ Richard Dreyfuss (Mr. Holland’s Opus)

Most schools are letting out for the summer, and it’s the time that many decide to make budget cuts for the upcoming year. Hopefully music does not get cut in your area, as learning music teaches so much more than just notes on a page!!

I cry a little every time I hear about a school cutting arts.

The Wholesale Indoctrination of School Children by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC)

Parents, only YOU can set your children free from classroom indoctrination

It sure isn’t Miss Francis and Romper Room

When little school kids talk about what they are learning in class, it’s no longer about anything to do concerning the ‘Three Rs’, it’s about the Politics of Inclusion, which they learn through indoctrination.

Self-acclaimed Patron Saint of Tolerance and Diversity Jessi Cruickshank leads children in this CBC video in a “rah!” “rah!” for Happy Pride Month, which according to Cruickshank, viewers “loved”. Continue reading

Screen Time Syndrome: Brain Images Explain Why Kids Are Moody, Impulsive & Can’t Pay Attention

Screen time, in its multiple forms, will be part of your children’s lives at some point. But parents must ask themselves how early and to what extent?

AN EDUCATIONAL EDGE?
Some parents think they’re giving their child an educational edge like Susan who bought her 6-year-old son John an iPad when he was in first grade. She thought, ‘Why not let him get a jump on things?’ John’s school had begun using the devices with younger and younger grades – and his technology teacher had raved about their educational benefits. Continue reading

Studies show pen and paper beats laptop for retaining info in class

Even though technology allows us to do more in less time, it does not always foster learning.

That’s why some college professors are saying “no more laptops or tablets” and going old-school, forcing note taking on paper only. But, students who grew up more familiar with keyboards than cursive are struggling to adjust to this device-free stance.

University of Kansas associate professor of journalism Carol Holstead is one of many across the country who initially noticed how distracted students became while taking notes on their laptops. Continue reading

Minnesota public school forcing KINDERGARTEN students to study ‘WHITE privilege’

Institutional Racism: Children in the Edina School District in Edina, Minnesota are introduced to the concept of “white privilege” in their classes, the Weekly Standard reported.

In particular, Kindergartners must take part in something called the Melanin Project in order to be taught about social justice and white privilege.

During the course of instruction, students are asked to draw an outline of their hand and then color them to reflect their skin tone.

Cut-outs of the traced hands are then put on a poster with these words: “Stop thinking your skin color is better than everyone elses!-(sic) Everyone is special!Continue reading

Why Are So Many ‘Whiz Kids’ Homeschoolers?

It seems like every graduation season has its stories of whiz kids. The kids who are so ambitious and so accomplished that they’re graduating from high school, and even college, before the normal time.

One of the latest is 14-year-old Matthew McKenzie from Georgia, who received his high school diploma and associate degree the same day. And like many other whiz kids, McKenzie was – you guessed it – homeschooled. Matthew’s mother, Monique McCord tells the story:

“We would pull material from different textbooks and different resources so I would pretty much custom create his curriculum.” Continue reading

Proposal to aid Education reform

Photo: Clemens v. Vogelsang / CC BY 2.0

I am writing this because I found a legal way to force the public schools in the USA to have to reform whether they want to or not. I have discussed this at length with people who understand law, politics, education, and more. There is a consensus among them that this may very well be a good way to make something good happen. Here it is in it’s most basic form.

First, ALL public schools in the USA are under what is known as “En Loco Parentis“, which means, “in place of parents”. They are responsible for all children attending the schools of that district. Also, in the bylaws or governing documents, it can be found some statement to the effect, if not in exact words, “It is our pupose to provide a safe learning environment for all children in our care”, or something to similar effect. That places the school and it’s officials and personnel in legal liability for those children if something happens to them. Continue reading

Public Eduction Hopelessly Corrupt & Politicized

A great discussion on Stefan Molyneux’s channel, when a teacher called in and discussed the remnants of the US education system. It is worse than any of us thought. And it is perfectly legal. From the kid that shows up with a gun or knife and isn’t kicked out of school or sent to a mental institution to the local school board counting bodies as a way to increase their revenue stream to the mothers that want their child to be declared autistic so the single mother can continue to get welfare (for life) to take care of her autistic child (as SSI disability for the kid also provides benefits to the mother as a caregiver, all part of the scam). It’s lunacy and it is not going to end well.

Frederick Douglass Finally Gets His University Degree

Frederick Douglas ~ American

It is long overdue, but one of America’s greatest writers, orators, and voices of freedom has finally received a degree from his hometown university, the University of Rochester. It is an honorary degree, as he was denied an opportunity for a normal education when he was young. While he was not able to attend himself, his great-great-great grandson, Kenneth B. Morris, Jr., accepted the award on his behalf. Frederick Douglass died in 1895, but his name remains familiar today with all who know American history. We are a better nation for his presence.

Douglass was born a slave, most likely in 1818, on a plantation in Maryland. He was taken from his mother at a very early age, lived with his grandmother until separated from her at age 6, and was passed around to his master’s brother and then hired out to a man who beat him. For a while, his master’s wife taught him the alphabet and basics of reading, but stopped when his master expressed the view that learning to read would encourage the slave to seek freedom. Still, Douglass managed to gain access to reading material, and some assistance from white children. He became a voracious, if clandestine, reader. Denied a formal education, he taught himself. Continue reading

K-12: History of the Conspiracy against Reading

In his 1984 book about American education, Samuel Blumenfeld pointed out that “[n]othing has mystified Americans more than the massive decline of literacy in the United States. Children spend more time at school and the government spends more money on education than ever before. Yet, reading ability keeps declining. What has gone wrong?”

You have probably heard this lament. But here’s where it becomes really alarming. Blumenfeld looked back seven decades to the year 1915. That’s when the literacy figures for 1910 were published by the U.S. Bureau of Education and quoted in a weekly publication, School and Society, edited by James McCain Cattelll, one of the luminaries in the Progressive education movement. School and Society stated that: Continue reading

California’s Common Core Mistake

 

The Common Core curriculum-content standards are a national listing of topics that students are expected to learn in the subjects of English and mathematics. An independent initiative of three Washington, D.C.-based organizations created the national standards, but they were endorsed and promoted by the Obama-era U.S. Department of Education. The standards were released in June 2010. Their summer launch meant that teachers and parents did not have much of an opportunity to discuss their merits and drawbacks. Abiding by the standards was necessary for states to be eligible for massive federal grants. California adopted the national standards and fully implemented them in 2014-2015. Continue reading

Well Johnny What Did You Learn At School Today?

“By educating the young generation along the right lines, the People’s State will have to see to it that a generation of mankind is formed which will be adequate to this supreme combat that will decide the destinies of the world.” ~ Adolf Hitler

It’s 3 O’clock in the afternoon when little Johnny comes barging through the front door after school, throws his back pack into a corner and heads for the refrigerator. He yanks open the refrigerator door and pulls out a carton of milk. He gets a glass from the cupboard and fills the glass full from the milk carton. He gulps down the milk and heads for his bedroom where his play station awaits his anxious fingers. But before he can leave the kitchen, his mom says, “Wait a minute Johnny, I want to hear how your day at school went.” Johnny says, “Oh mom!” and returns to the kitchen. Continue reading

Another Take: The Teacher Strikes Aren’t About Pay…

They’re About Mobilizing Democrats

Democrats and their allies among the teacher activists are following the playbook outlined by Saul Alinsky in ‘Rules for Radicals.’

Teachers all over the country are going on strike. They say they want higher salaries and education funding and the tax increases necessary to pay for them. But there’s a bigger motivation underlying the strikes — mobilizing Democrats.

The strikes began in West Virginia on Feb. 22 when teachers walked off the job. They demanded higher salaries and relief from increasing health insurance costs. The teachers stayed off the job until March 7. The legislature approved a 5 percent pay increase for all state employees. West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice appointed a task force to lower healthcare costs… Continue reading

Three Education Stories Show Why We Are (Still) Doomed

I’m having a fire sale on education stories this week. Also a parallel fire sale on quotes from my 2009 book We Are Doomed, because the education chapter of that book was the most fun to write and it’s pertinent to this week’s stories. Here’s a sort of keynote quote from that chapter:

The whole topic of education is a glorious feast for pessimists of all kinds.

Education story #1: PS , an elementary school, kindergarten through fifth grade, on West 70th Street in Manhattan. That’s a tony neighborhood. A two-bedroom apartment on West 70th will currently cost you around two million dollars.

I wrote about PS 199 in the education chapter of We Are Doomed. A kerfuffle had broken broke out in November 2008, when an apartment up there only cost one million dollars: Continue reading

Juntti: Can your children read CURSIVE???

I had a very restless night of sleep last night due to finding out that one of my great grand kids can’t read cursive. He will be 13 in October!!! How did I learn this bit of information?

I bought four of my great grandkids their first bible and wrote a personal note to each of them on the inside page. The 12 year old came over to thank me for it and I asked him if he read my note to him. He looked at me and said he can’t read ‘cursive,’ as if it is a foreign language or such. He had to have his mom read it to him and said she had trouble too. I have always had compliments on my handwriting so it isn’t that my handwriting is bad. I began learning to write in cursive in the third grade. Continue reading

This is Not a Day Care. It’s a University!

Oklahoma Wesleyan University

This past week, I actually had a student come forward after a university chapel service and complain because he felt “victimized” by a sermon on the topic of 1 Corinthians 13. It appears this young scholar felt offended because a homily on love made him feel bad for not showing love. In his mind, the speaker was wrong for making him, and his peers, feel uncomfortable.

I’m not making this up. Our culture has actually taught our kids to be this self-absorbed and narcissistic. Any time their feelings are hurt, they are the victims. Anyone who dares challenge them and, thus, makes them “feel bad” about themselves, is a “hater,” a “bigot,” an “oppressor,” and a “victimizer.” Continue reading

65% of Public School 8th Graders Not Proficient in Reading

67% Not Proficient in Math

A student is showing his frustration at the example of the new math.

Sixty-five percent of the eighth graders in American public schools in 2017 were not proficient in reading and 67 percent were not proficient in mathematics, according to the National Assessment of Educational Progress test results released by the U.S. Department of Education.

The results are far worse for students enrolled in some urban districts. Continue reading