Who was George Mifflin Dallas in American History?

Part 2: Will Dallas join the 2017 Great Purge of American History?

Does the Dallas task force on Confederate monuments know what the antebellum politician, for whom their city was named, thought about the Congressional Acts that supported slavery?

George Mifflin Dallas was born July 10, 1792, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Before he died on December 31, 1864, he served as an American diplomat to two countries, and was elected or appointed to government service at the city, state, and national levels representing the Democratic Party.

Here is a list of most of his major achievements: Continue reading

Can you please talk, not text?

Parenting the Instagram generation

Can kids be encouraged to let go of the virtual world – occasionally – and engage in the real one? Can they stop posting selfies long enough to think of someone else? The answer is yes. But there are bound to be some anxious moments for parents along the way.

Jake Lee, a tanned California teenager in baggy shorts and a T-shirt, is lounging on the floor of his parents’ midcentury home. They live in a suburban Silicon Valley enclave of tech workers, cyber-savvy kids, and the occasional Google self-driving car that whirs past along pristine, eucalyptus-lined streets. He flicks through his iPhone, his fingers moving with the speed and dexterity of a jazz pianist, as he answers the sporadic text message.

I’m on social media every waking moment of my life,” he says, with no particular pride. “I could be, like, Snapchatting and Instagram messaging the same person at the same time.” Continue reading

Teachers share 23 things they’d love to tell their students but can’t

Some of these things could end up being a service to young people, if only someone would just tell them. Joe Raedle/Getty Images

To maintain order in the classroom — and to keep their jobs — there are some things teachers just can’t tell their students, even if they want to, but some of these things, while perhaps controversial, could end up being a service to young people, if only someone would just tell them. Continue reading

What crisis? Fatherhood is alive and well!

It would seem that this might not be the proper web-site to post the following commentary, however in my opinion – it exactly the correct place to post this thought provoking piece. After all – Father’s are equally as necessary in the education and upbringing as are Mothers. It’s called family. ~ J.B.

As an active and involved dad, a parent advocate, and author of 12 parenting books, I appreciate that every third Sunday in June is reserved to celebrate fatherhood. However, it frustrates me to watch how, in the succeeding 364 days, conversations about fatherhood revert to misrepresenting fatherhood as well as devaluing a dad’s role as a parent.

Ironically, leading the campaign of how dads fall short of their responsibilities are organizations such as the National Fatherhood Initiative and the National Center for Fathering, both of which debuted in the early 1990s. Continue reading

Parents beware: Schools annulling your ‘bigoted’ views

Parents in a northern California community aren’t happy with a kindergarten teacher for discussing transgender issues with students – something one family advocate saw coming years ago.

According to CBS 13 in Sacramento, the incident happened at Rocklin Charter School Academy just before students left for the summer break. Concerned parents went to the school board meeting Tuesday night to speak out on the issue. They say a kindergarten teacher, who stands by her actions, read “gender identity” books to her class before a student changed clothing as part of an effort to reveal that student’s “true gender.” Continue reading

Common Core? 6th Graders Taught How to Use Strap-On Dildo

Explicit: 11-12 year olds given sex toy lesson in Jacksonville

Shocking images out of a classroom in Jacksonville, Florida illustrate how 11-12 year olds in 6th grade are being taught how to use strap-on dildos amidst a debate about Common Core sex education standards which have been attacked by some as pornographic.

The pictures were taken by a student with a cellphone camera. They show a teacher demonstrating how to use a strap-on sex toy in a number of different positions.

In one image, the teacher even shows how to insert the strap-on while her buttocks are in the air and her legs up over her head.

In another image, the woman shows the children how to wear a harness to which the strap-on is attached. Continue reading

Dillard: Lascivious Ambition

I haven’t the education nor the inclination to write so many words.

But to the point and I pray these words will reach the Governor and all political representatives.

An Open Letter to Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe

I was born in Los Angeles, California and raised in Ohio. I have taught Political Science at the collegiate level in Cincinnati, been published in The Wall Street Journal and am in my 12th year of research for a forthcoming book on Columbine.

For the past seven years I have made Rockbridge County, Virginia my home. That was a dream planted in my heart as a 14-year-old boy decades ago on my first visit to the Commonwealth. I have loved this commonwealth since then and when offered a change of life, there was never a moment’s indecision where to move. Virginia first, Virginia only, Virginia last and Virginia always.

I chose Lexington for just one reason. I had no family in Virginia. I had no prospects for employment lined up in Virginia. I owned no property here. None of the factors that ordinarily move men to uproot after a lifetime in one state and move to a place where he has no ties motivated me. The one and only reason I live in Lexington, Virginia is because it is the final resting place of Robert E. Lee and Thomas J. Jackson. Their lives, character, faith, integrity, honor and testimony shone so brightly a century and a half after their decease that there is no other place on the Earth I want to be but where they lived and served. Continue reading

The Quiet Exodus From Mass Schooling

With more schooling options available, millions of parents are choosing non-traditional education options for their children.

Parents are fed up. As mass schooling becomes more restrictive, more standardized and more far-reaching into a child’s young life, many parents are choosing alternatives. Increasingly, these parents are reclaiming their child’s education and are refocusing learning around children, family, and community in several different ways. Continue reading

Are Charter Schools Better Than Public Schools?

When a government monopoly is threatened by the ability to compete and improve.

Get rid of Common Core, and it is replaced by the same thing with a different name. Shift to charter schools, and the government will use the financial purse strings to dictate curriculum. The only way to stop this is to cut the federal financial ties to the education of our children. Then, each state will answer to the parents. To save America, we must save one child at a time. It starts with the education of our children. Join the cause. ~ Rosemary Stein, M.D.

Before Charlottesville, Democrats voted for racist policies for more than 100 years

In the aftermath of Charlottesville, an awful lot of awful things have been said about Republicans and race relations – BUT you might wish to reconsider what you have heard.

The Democratic Party was responsible for passing Jim Crow laws, in addition to Black Civil Codes that forced Americans to utilize separate drinking fountains, swimming pools, and other facilities in the 20th century. (Wikipedia Commons)

However, the Left’s accusations of racism couldn’t be further from the truth that has played out in the halls of Congress over the last 150 years.

It is shocking that as talk of statues and historical racism is being bandied about, no one has mentioned the Democrats’ utterly shameful treatment of African Americans throughout history.

Over the last 100 years, Republicans have stood up for African Americans while Democrats not only stood on the sidelines, but in fact served as obstructionists to civil liberties.

Here are at least 12 examples in which Democrats voted against African Americans, and Republicans voted to free them: Continue reading

Get Out of My Class and Leave America

College Professor’s Epic Class Introduction Went Viral

Originally published in August of 2015 – but well worth the read. ~ J.B.

Author’s Note: The following column is comprised of excerpts taken from my first lectures on the first day of classes this semester at UNC-Wilmington. I reproduced these remarks with the hope that they would be useful to other professors teaching at public universities all across America. Feel free to use this material if you already have tenure. Continue reading

Education Created and Promoted Progressivism, ANTIFA, and BLM

Brainwashing of Academia, Hollywood, Communist foreign infiltrators, and the mainstream media

As a parent who struggles to pay the tuition for their child at the average university in America, or goes into debt borrowing the money, consider what your child must face in order to finish a four years of college education, which may or may not help them get a job.

The American campus is no longer the place of learning, to discuss and exchange ideas, it has become a place of indoctrination, of fear, a place where your children are further indoctrinated, and are not prepared to deal with or function in real life and in the job world. Continue reading

How we know the so-called ‘Civil War’ was not over slavery

When I read Professor Thomas DiLorenzo’s article, the question that lept to mind was, “How come the South is said to have fought for slavery when the North wasn’t fighting against slavery?”

Two days before Lincoln’s inauguration as the 16th President, Congress, consisting only of the Northern states, passed overwhelmingly on March 2, 1861, the Corwin Amendment that gave constitutional protection to slavery. Lincoln endorsed the amendment in his inaugural address, saying “I have no objection to its being made express and irrevocable.”

Quite clearly, the North was not prepared to go to war in order to end slavery when on the very eve of war the US Congress and incoming president were in the process of making it unconstitutional to abolish slavery. Continue reading

Josie Wales, aka Bushwhacker Bill Wilson

Bushwacker Bill Wilson

The story of Bill Wilson has been told throughout the Ozark Mountains since he began his bloody career in 1861 to the present day. He is a true folk hero. The Ozarks were full of men who took to the bush and waged a single man to a small gang warfare on the union soldiers, red legs, jayhawkers and spies for the Union. Although there were a lot of these men, if someone said, “The Bushwhacker,” “The Great Bushwhacker,” or the “Famous Bushwhacker,” everyone knew that they were talking about Bill Wilson. His daring deeds are still considered miracles due to his never being wounded once. He is remembered for his superior skill with revolvers and clever tactics in surprising his enemies. The writings and movie about Josie Wales are based on the real bushwhacker, Bill Wilson.

Bill Wilson was born around 1830 in Phelps County, Missouri. His father, Sol Wilson, was a very well-to-do farmer who owned several slaves, but freed them before the Civil War. Sol remained neutral and advised his children to do the same. Continue reading

Does Education Work?

One Room Schoolhouse

Just about everyone from left to right believes in the power of more education for more Americans, that more education for all will open up opportunity, raise standards of living, and reduce economic inequality. Some scholars, however, are skeptical.

They have at least three related arguments. One is that the content of education–perhaps beyond basic literacy and skills– does not matter for individuals’ economic attainment, that what matters is the person’s relative level of education. When few people have graduated high school, doing so will make a big difference, but when most people have a high school diploma, then real success then requires going to college. Employers just up their requirements as educational attainment spreads, so what is important is being ahead of the pack. Continue reading

A. Lincoln, Socialist?

A while ago, I was dumbstruck by a comment a Republican party insurgent in Utah made about her former governor, Jon Huntsman, Jr., a Republican politician who received strong kudos from the libertarian Cato Institute. “‘On a good day, a socialist,’ said Darcy Van Orden, a co-founder of Utah Rising . . . . ‘On a bad day, he’s a communist’.” And, of course, people like Ms. Van Orden consider it obvious that Barack Obama is a socialist, if not worse. David Koch, one of the brother team of conservative financial angels, commented, for example, that Obama’s “father was a hard core economic socialist in Kenya . . . [and Obama] was apparently from what I read a great admirer of his father’s points of view.”

Abraham Lincoln It is striking how the term “socialist” has been redefined so that almost any policy and anyone can get that label. Indeed, many a past president would qualify by these standards ­ surely FDR, Truman, and Democrats through Clinton ­ but so would Republican presidents. By the standards of people such as Ms. Van Orden and David Koch, Abraham Lincoln was surely an out-and-out “socialist-communist.”

Lincoln Socialism
Let’s consider the Lincoln record. During just one term (plus 45 days), Lincoln managed to do the following “socialist-communist” acts: Continue reading

Smith: In Defense of General Lee

Let me begin on a personal note. I am a 56-year-old, third-generation, African American Washingtonian who is a graduate of the D.C. public schools and who happens also to be a great admirer of Robert E. Lee.

Today, Lee, who surrendered his troops to Gen. Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court House 134 years ago, is under attack by people – black and white – who have incorrectly characterized him as a traitorous, slaveholding racist. He was recently besieged in Richmond by those opposed to having his portrait displayed prominently in a new park.

My first visit to Lee’s former home, now Arlington National Cemetery, came when I was 12 years old, and it had a profound and lasting effect on me. Since then I have visited the cemetery hundreds of times searching for grave sites and conducting study tours for the Smithsonian Institution and various other groups interested in learning more about Lee and his family as well as many others buried at Arlington. Continue reading

Teddy Stoddard ~ A Touching Story

There is a story many years ago of an elementary teacher. Her name was Mrs. Thompson. And as she stood in front of her 5th grade class on the very first day of school, she told the children a lie. Like most teachers, she looked at her students and said that she loved them all the same. But that was impossible, because there in the front row, slumped in his seat, was a little boy named Teddy Stoddard.

Mrs. Thompson had watched Teddy the year before and noticed that he didn’t play well with the other children, that his clothes were messy and that he constantly needed a bath. And Teddy could be unpleasant.

It got to the point where Mrs. Thompson would actually take delight in marking his papers with a broad red pen, making bold X’s and then putting a big F at the top of his papers. Continue reading

Because you are here

The Confederate First Sergeant…

photo Courtesy of Brandon Anderson Collection

The Union cavalry surrounded a lone Confederate soldier who had no horse and whose clothes were dirty and tattered. A Union officer said to him that it was obvious that he had no wealth and not the means to own slaves. The officer asked: “Why are you fighting this war?”  Continue reading