Category Archives: WORDS That Men Lived By

1620: Immigrant Religious Extremist Group Signs Manifesto

The Pilgrim’s Mayflower Compact is signed

CAPE COD, 1620 ~ A group of fundamentalist religious immigrants from Europe joined together today on a tiny ship called the Mayflower harbored in Cape Cod. Their purpose was to sign an agreement before establishing a religious settlement in the area to be called Massachusetts. According to inside sources, the manifesto declares their intentions to use the settlement as a base for increasing their religious sect in the New World.

The band of 103 immigrants left Holland a few months ago, and endured treacherous storms during their travels. They came to North America for freedom to practice their religion.

The religious group’s radical leader, William Brewster, led the group in signing the agreement with each other. Another leader, William Bradford, inside sources say, may be drafted to run for mayor of the fundamentalist Christian settlement. Continue reading

an American Revolution

And so we begin…

What we begin this day, is the culmination of a nearly 19 year-long project by Kettle Moraine, Ltd. Publications, which includes the intellectual battle which led to the formation of the Law of the Land – our Constitution! In addition, we will be publishing those papers and proclamations which came before, including such works as the Mayflower Compact and The Articles of Confederation, some of which have been previously published in our book, AMERICA the Grand Illusion ~ BOOK I: Orphans of the Storm

You’ll note our first posting below, The Magna Charta (1215), for this is where our American Revolution began. This entirety of this project will be lengthy and arduous – as  there over 700 pages of records to load (to include possible cross-references between both the Federalist and Anti-Federalist Papers alone) – and hopefully our end result will provide one of the most thorough and complete dissertations of these monumental records ever published on-line – with (planned for) links connecting the ‘Point’ and ‘Counterpoint’ views of the participants and authors. We look forward to the insight and involvement of Neal Ross on this portion of the project.

For teachers and educators – as well as those who just want to expand their historical knowledge – we are proud to bring this project to you… and so we begin.

Jeffrey Bennett, Publisher Continue reading

The Magna Charta (1215)

“The democratic aspiration is no mere recent phase in human history… It was written in Magna Carta.” – Franklin Delano Roosevelt, 1941 Inaugural address

June 15, 1215 – In a field at Runnymede, King John affixed his seal to Magna Carta. Confronted by 40 rebellious barons, he consented to their demands in order to avert civil war. Just 10 weeks later, Pope Innocent III nullified the agreement, and England plunged into internal war.

Although Magna Carta failed to resolve the conflict between King John and his barons, it was reissued several times after his death.

Magna Carta was written by a group of 13th-century barons to protect their rights and property against a tyrannical king. It is concerned with many practical matters and specific grievances relevant to the feudal system under which they lived. The interests of the common man were hardly apparent in the minds of the men who brokered the agreement. But there are two principles expressed in Magna Carta that resonate to this day:

“No freeman shall be taken, imprisoned, disseised, outlawed, banished, or in any way destroyed, nor will We proceed against or prosecute him, except by the lawful judgment of his peers and by the law of the land.”

“To no one will We sell, to no one will We deny or delay, right or justice.”

During the American Revolution, Magna Carta served to inspire and justify action in liberty’s defense. The colonists believed they were entitled to the same rights as Englishmen, rights guaranteed in Magna Carta. They embedded those rights into the laws of their states and later into the Constitution and Bill of Rights.

The Fifth Amendment to the U. S. Constitution (“no person shall . . . be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law.”) is a direct descendent of Magna Carta’s guarantee of proceedings according to the “law of the land.” Continue reading

Introduction to ‘Words’

“Your adversaries are composed of wretches who laugh at the rights of humanity, who turn religion into derision, and would, for higher wages, direct their swords against their leaders of their country. WE have no other choice than independence.” ~ Samuel Adams, 1776

In the 1940 MGM movie, Northwest Passage, starring Spencer Tracy (as Major Robert Rogers), and Robert Young (as fictional cartographer, Harvard graduate, Langdon Towne), there were several instances where Rogers and his master map-maker would be separated for one reason or another, whether for hours or longer, and each time they parted, Roger’s would say to Towne, “I’ll see you at sun-down!” It is a line of dialog I have never forgotten.

As I write, it is past one o’clock on the morning of February 5, 2017, and as I ponder on my nearly seven decades on this earth – I wonder what my grandchildren will face when they reach my age.

During these years, I have watched and witnessed the decline and fall of this once great Republic which my ancestors had fought for; those who came to these shores shortly after the Mayflower and settled in Boston in 1633 (David Sellack, né Sellick); those who fought for freedom and liberty during the war for our Independence; those who forged westward to settle in what was then known as the West (Ohio, Illinois and Wisconsin) and those who chose to fight for what they believed in during the War of Northern aggression (Uncle Sam Cole of Harvard, Illinois). Continue reading