Category Archives: Mr. Adair’s Classroom

Where REAL American history comes to life – that which hasn’t been taught in the Public ‘school’ system in America for a very long time. It doesn’t fit the agenda. INVITATION: Serious Teachers and Educators everywhere – bring your students here for REAL history lessons. Then open the dialog. Mr. Adair is ready to continue – or shall we say – “enlighten you.”

September 15, 1862: Antietam Creek, Maryland

Did battle, and US future, hang on thread of fate?

Originally Published on the 150th anniversary of the Battle at Antietam Creek.

SHARPSBURG, Md. ­ – From as far away as Minnesota, Colorado and Ohio they came, more than 30 members of the Bloss and Mitchell families who converged on the hallowed Civil War fighting grounds of rural Maryland.

John McKnight Bloss, now 81, had just parked his RV at a campground when he tried to sum up what this gathering of his clan was about. He’s been researching his namesake great-grandfather, who was wounded four times during Civil War battles, including the epic fight along meandering Antietam Creek 150 years ago – and he wanted the younger generation to “understand the sacrifices that were made.”

Robert Mitchell Menuet spoke proudly of Barton Mitchell, his ancestor who served alongside John Bloss in the 27th Indiana Volunteer Infantry and suffered a life-shortening wound at Antietam – one of the 23,000 casualties that made the battle on Sept. 17, 1862, the single bloodiest day in U.S. history.

But something more particular drew the descendants to Maryland. Continue reading

1620: Immigrant Religious Extremist Group Signs Manifesto

The Pilgrim’s Mayflower Compact is signed

CAPE COD, 1620 ~ A group of fundamentalist religious immigrants from Europe joined together today on a tiny ship called the Mayflower harbored in Cape Cod. Their purpose was to sign an agreement before establishing a religious settlement in the area to be called Massachusetts. According to inside sources, the manifesto declares their intentions to use the settlement as a base for increasing their religious sect in the New World.

The band of 103 immigrants left Holland a few months ago, and endured treacherous storms during their travels. They came to North America for freedom to practice their religion.

The religious group’s radical leader, William Brewster, led the group in signing the agreement with each other. Another leader, William Bradford, inside sources say, may be drafted to run for mayor of the fundamentalist Christian settlement. Continue reading

Confederate Monument Entrusted to Public Servants

The following is a news account of the unveiling of the Confederate Monument in Lumberton, North Carolina in 1907, a scene replicated across the South in similar ceremonies which honored the service and sacrifice of Southern men who left their homes and families to defend their State and country. It is important to note that these monuments were left to the custody of public authorities who were expected to provide perpetual care and faithfully honor the men who gave their lives for political freedom and liberty. ~ Bernhard Thuersam

Robeson County Confederate Monument Unveiling, Friday, 10 May, 1907

“The most notable day in the history of Robeson county was the unveiling of the Confederate monument on Friday, the Tenth of May. This occasion had long been looked forward to, and by daybreak people were gathering from every direction. Carriages, buggies, wagons, carts, automobiles, wheels and every kind of vehicle was put in use on that day to bring the people interested.

By ten ‘clock it was with difficulty that one could make his way along the streets. Never before has such an immense crowd been assembled in Robeson county. No drinking, no misbehavior of any kind was witnessed that day. A matter of much comment was the splendid appearance of those present. Robeson well has a right to feel proud of her citizenship.

The streets and public buildings of the town were elaborately and beautifully decorated in national colors, and suspended across Main Street, banners were hung with the word “Welcome” on them in letters to catch the eye of every passerby. On the corner of Fifth and Main Streets, a booth was beautifully decorated, and here the badges of the day were bestowed upon the Veterans. Continue reading

And You Thought They Only Vandalized Confederate Monuments and Graves (so you didn’t say anything)

What has transpired over the past year since Al Benson Jr. wrote the following piece, is appalling – as it should be – to ALL Americans. We have taken the liberty to open with a modified rendering of the writings by the great Martin Niemöller. We find it more fitting today than one year ago. ~ J.B.

First the came for the Media in order to control the minds of the people, and I did not speak out — because I was not a newspaperman or writer

Then they came for the cemeteries up North, and I did not speak out — because I was not from the North.

Then they came for the Confederate Memorials and cemeteries, and I did not speak out —
because I was not from the South.

Then they came for the Memorials and Statues and papers of our founding, and I did not speak out — because I cared not for the nations’ past.

Then they came for America and there was no one left to speak for her.

You can tell that the history destroyers had a busy couple weeks during the end of May, and it didn’t all happen in Dixie.

I read three separate articles June 1st about vandalism in cemeteries–all in the North. In Dixie we have grown used to this sort of thing. There are ugly people down here that, in some twisted way, seem to think they are doing humanity a service if they vandalize and destroy anything they remotely perceive as being “Confederate.” They remind me of those that Jesus spoke of in Scripture when he talked about those that would kill Christians and think they were doing God a service. Such is their “contribution” to humanity–it’s all they really know how to do. Should they somehow end up holding an intelligent position on anything they really can’t debate it with any genuine opposition, so they destroy what they hate because they can’t legitimately defend what they love–which in many cases, is indefensible.
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an American Revolution

And so we begin…

What we begin this day, is the culmination of a nearly 19 year-long project by Kettle Moraine, Ltd. Publications, which includes the intellectual battle which led to the formation of the Law of the Land – our Constitution! In addition, we will be publishing those papers and proclamations which came before, including such works as the Mayflower Compact and The Articles of Confederation, some of which have been previously published in our book, AMERICA the Grand Illusion ~ BOOK I: Orphans of the Storm

You’ll note our first posting below, The Magna Charta (1215), for this is where our American Revolution began. This entirety of this project will be lengthy and arduous – as  there over 700 pages of records to load (to include possible cross-references between both the Federalist and Anti-Federalist Papers alone) – and hopefully our end result will provide one of the most thorough and complete dissertations of these monumental records ever published on-line – with (planned for) links connecting the ‘Point’ and ‘Counterpoint’ views of the participants and authors. We look forward to the insight and involvement of Neal Ross on this portion of the project.

For teachers and educators – as well as those who just want to expand their historical knowledge – we are proud to bring this project to you… and so we begin.

Jeffrey Bennett, Publisher Continue reading

The Magna Charta (1215)

“The democratic aspiration is no mere recent phase in human history… It was written in Magna Carta.” – Franklin Delano Roosevelt, 1941 Inaugural address

June 15, 1215 – In a field at Runnymede, King John affixed his seal to Magna Carta. Confronted by 40 rebellious barons, he consented to their demands in order to avert civil war. Just 10 weeks later, Pope Innocent III nullified the agreement, and England plunged into internal war.

Although Magna Carta failed to resolve the conflict between King John and his barons, it was reissued several times after his death.

Magna Carta was written by a group of 13th-century barons to protect their rights and property against a tyrannical king. It is concerned with many practical matters and specific grievances relevant to the feudal system under which they lived. The interests of the common man were hardly apparent in the minds of the men who brokered the agreement. But there are two principles expressed in Magna Carta that resonate to this day:

“No freeman shall be taken, imprisoned, disseised, outlawed, banished, or in any way destroyed, nor will We proceed against or prosecute him, except by the lawful judgment of his peers and by the law of the land.”

“To no one will We sell, to no one will We deny or delay, right or justice.”

During the American Revolution, Magna Carta served to inspire and justify action in liberty’s defense. The colonists believed they were entitled to the same rights as Englishmen, rights guaranteed in Magna Carta. They embedded those rights into the laws of their states and later into the Constitution and Bill of Rights.

The Fifth Amendment to the U. S. Constitution (“no person shall . . . be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law.”) is a direct descendent of Magna Carta’s guarantee of proceedings according to the “law of the land.” Continue reading

Introduction to ‘Words’

“Your adversaries are composed of wretches who laugh at the rights of humanity, who turn religion into derision, and would, for higher wages, direct their swords against their leaders of their country. WE have no other choice than independence.” ~ Samuel Adams, 1776

In the 1940 MGM movie, Northwest Passage, starring Spencer Tracy (as Major Robert Rogers), and Robert Young (as fictional cartographer, Harvard graduate, Langdon Towne), there were several instances where Rogers and his master map-maker would be separated for one reason or another, whether for hours or longer, and each time they parted, Roger’s would say to Towne, “I’ll see you at sun-down!” It is a line of dialog I have never forgotten.

As I write, it is past one o’clock on the morning of February 5, 2017, and as I ponder on my nearly seven decades on this earth – I wonder what my grandchildren will face when they reach my age.

During these years, I have watched and witnessed the decline and fall of this once great Republic which my ancestors had fought for; those who came to these shores shortly after the Mayflower and settled in Boston in 1633 (David Sellack, né Sellick); those who fought for freedom and liberty during the war for our Independence; those who forged westward to settle in what was then known as the West (Ohio, Illinois and Wisconsin) and those who chose to fight for what they believed in during the War of Northern aggression (Uncle Sam Cole of Harvard, Illinois). Continue reading

Why the Colonies’ Most Galvanizing Patriot Never Became a Founding Father

James Otis, Jr. used his words to whip anti-British sentiment into a frenzy—so why isn’t he better remembered now?

Portrait of James Otis (1725-1783)

As John Adams told it, the American Revolution didn’t start in Philadelphia, or at Lexington and Concord. Instead, the second president traced the nation’s birth to February 24, 1761, when James Otis, Jr., rose in Boston’s Massachusetts Town House to defend American liberty.

That day, as five red-robed judges—and a rapt, 25-year-old Adams—listened, Otis delivered a five-hour oration against the Writs of Assistance, sweeping warrants that allowed British customs officials to search any place, anytime, for evidence of smuggling.

“It appears to me the worst instrument of arbitrary power,” argued Otis, “the most destructive of English liberty…that was ever found in an English law-book.” Until this case, the 36-year-old lawyer had been Massachusetts’ advocate general. But he resigned rather than defend the writs, then agreed to provide pro bono representation to the merchants fighting against them. Inside the courtroom, Otis denounced the British king, parliament, and nation as oppressors of the American colonies—electrifying spectators. Continue reading

The FINAL Word: Southern Heritage is a Threat to the Deep State

In an age where the accounts of history are no longer taught or the chronicles of past generations are lost to the consciousness of the current culture; all that is left is a fairy tale of deception designed to confuse, indoctrinate and eliminate critical thinking. Astute students of the War of Northern Aggression understand that the cessation of hostilities set into motion the forces of imperialism and the perversion of a Constitution with the addition of harmful amendments. Liberty was the primary causality of all the bloodshed and the institution of a totalitarian statist regime became the permanent outcome of the conflict. Continue reading

UPDATED: The South and Her People

The conservative and noble Christian civilization of the South described below has all but vanished as the New South of industrial capitalism, materialism and commercial vulgarity supplanted it. ~ Bernhard Thuersam, April 16, 2017

Benjamin H. Hill Statue, Atlanta, Georgia

Remarks of J.C.C. Black, at the Unveiling of the Benjamin H. Hill Statue, Atlanta, Georgia, May 1, 1886 (excerpt):

“As to us, [secession] was not prompted by hatred of the Union resting upon the consent of the people, and governed by the Constitution of our fathers. It was not intended to subvert the vital principles of the government they founded, but to perpetuate them. The government of the new did not differ in its form or any of its essential principles from the old Confederacy. The Constitutions were the same, except such changes as the wisdom of experience suggested.

The Southern Confederacy contemplated no invasion or conquest. Its chief corner-stone was not African slavery. Its foundations were laid in the doctrines of the Fathers of the Republic, and the chief corner-stone was the essential fundamental principle of free government; that all governments derive their just powers from the consent of the governed. Continue reading

The Reason: No Submission to Northern Manufacturers

Publisher’s NOTE: The original day of publication of this column on the author’s blog, was the 152nd anniversary of the ‘surrender’ of the Confederacy to the ‘Union’ at Appomattox Court House in 1865. ~ J.B.

~ Forewords ~
It is said that the tariff was the most contentious issue in the United States between 1808 and 1832, and this exploded with South Carolina threatening tariff nullification in that latter year. This was settled with Congress steadily lowering tariffs. Economist Frank Taussig wrote in 1931 that by 1857 the maximum duty on imports had been reduced to twenty-four percent and a relative free trade ideal was reached, due to Southern pressure. He also noted that the new Republican-controlled Congress increased duties in December 1861 and that by 1862 the average tariff rates had crept up to 47.06%. ~ Bernhard Thuersam

“South Carolina had opposed the tariff from the earliest days of the republic. The very first Congress, in 1789, had included a group of Carolina representatives known as “anti-tariff men.” When the Washington administration sponsored a mild import measure, Senator Pierce Butler of the Palmetto State brought the charge that Congress was oppressing South Carolina and threatened a “dissolution of the Union, with regard to that State, as sure as God was in his firmament.”
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Today Jefferson Davis; Tomorrow Thomas Jefferson

This equestrian statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee will be removed from downtown Charlottesville, Va. following a vote by the City Council on Feb. 6, 2017.

All over the United States, memorials and statues of the great men of the Confederacy–along with the flags of the Confederacy–have either already been taken down or efforts are underway to take them down. I’m talking about places such as Biloxi, Mississippi; Charlottesville, Virginia; Austin, Texas; Louisville, Kentucky; Charleston, South Carolina; St. Louis, Missouri; Baltimore, Maryland; Orlando, Florida; and Memphis, Tennessee. The city of New Orleans, Louisiana, has taken down the statues of President Jefferson Davis and General P.G.T. Beauregard. The Jefferson Davis statue had stood since 1911. General Beauregard’s statue had stood since 1915.

In 1864, Confederate General Patrick Cleburne warned his fellow southerners of the historical consequences should the South lose their war for independence. He said if the South lost, “It means the history of this heroic struggle will be written by the enemy; that our youth will be trained by Northern schoolteachers; will learn from Northern school books their version of the war; will be impressed by the influences of history and education to regard our gallant dead as traitors, and our maimed veterans as fit objects for derision.” No truer words were ever spoken. Continue reading

The Theology of Secession

At the very deepest level there is a central truth about the War Between the States which is now, even by the best of Southerners, almost never mentioned, although their forefathers had once spoken of its importance continuously. Indeed, they put emphasis upon it long after the War was over. From 1850 until 1912, this explanatory assumption was a commonplace component of one understanding of the meaning of that great conflict. And to most Southerners, it seemed almost as self-evident as did the equivalent formulations to their Northern counterparts—especially in the years of Antebellum dispute over the morality of slaveholding and other distinctions of “character” separating the two original versions of American civilization. When Confederate Southerners stood ready to face death in the place where the battle was joined or when they came to write apologia for their conduct, they saw themselves as part of a struggle between “powers and principalities,” alternative conceptions of the human enterprise—not merely as adjuncts to competing schemes for gathering political power. Southerners, of course, fought to defend themselves and their view of the Constitution. They fought out of a loyalty to “hearth and rooftree,” and to what had been achieved by Americans in general between 1774 and 1791. Further, they were animated by a sense of personal honor and were therefore unwilling to continue association with their detractors within the federal bond once condemned by their erstwhile countrymen to live under the insufferable burden of high-handedness and effrontery. But that is not all of the story concerning their reasons for secession—not even the most interesting part. Continue reading

The First Legal Slave Owner in America Was a Black Man?

Here’s something you won’t read about in the US history books. The first legal slave owner in America was black and he owned white slaves.

Anthony Johnson (BC 1600 – 1670) was an Angolan who achieved freedom in the early 17th century Colony of Virginia.

Johnson was captured in his native Angola by an enemy tribe and sold to Arab (Muslim) slave traders. He was eventually sold as an indentured servant to a merchant working for the Virginia Company.

Sometime after 1635, Antonio and Mary gained their freedom from indenture. Antonio changed his name to Anthony Johnson. Continue reading

The Art of Teaching

Publisher’s Note: At Metropolis Café, we are fans of neither Horace Mann nor John Dewey. Although Mann had some interesting opinions (and some were damned good), the direction of both of these individuals – were of a Socialistic bent toward Indoctrination – not Education. ~ J.B.

Horace Mann

Getting your picture on a U.S. stamp, even a one cent one, requires that you have accomplished something significant. In the case of Horace Mann of Franklin Mass., he accomplished notable things in the early 19th century in three different fields— law, politics, and finally education,only to return to politics once more, this time as a U.S. Representative (previously he had only been involved in Mass. politics). In 1837, Mann became the president of the Massachusetts Board of Education, which was in fact the first such Board in any state in the U.S. and he served on that Board for twelve years. In his fourth year, he produced the essay now known as ‘the Art of Teaching’ which in fact was part of his report to the Board of Education. The essay is about educating children, but it has in some respects a quality to it that would apply to any sort of education and any age of student in any day and age. I intend to review some of the major points of the essay in this post. Continue reading

The Terrible Truth About Abraham Lincoln and the Confederate War

President Lincoln has been all but deified in America, with a god-like giant statue at a Parthenon-like memorial in Washington. Generations of school children have been indoctrinated with the story that “Honest Abe” Lincoln is a national hero who saved the Union and fought a noble war to end slavery, and that the “evil” Southern states seceded from the Union to protect slavery. This is the Yankee myth of history, written and promulgated by Northerners, and it is a complete falsity. It was produced and entrenched in the culture in large part to gloss over the terrible war crimes committed by Union soldiers in the War Between the States, as well as Lincoln’s violations of the law, his shredding of the Constitution, and other reprehensible acts. It has been very effective in keeping the average American ignorant of the real causes of the war, and the real nature, character and record of Lincoln. Let us look at some unpleasant facts. Continue reading

K-12: ‘Alien Covenant’

If you watch TV, you are seeing ads for a new Alien movie (i.e., Alien Covenant). All hail Ridley Scott. This will be the sixth in the franchise. One thing all of the entries have in common is that a ghastly alien emerges, often with pointy teeth and covered in drool, from an egg or an astronaut’s chest.

This signature sudden, unforgettable moment is the essence of the cinematic covenant. An entirely hostile organism will burst out somewhere when you least expect it and kill you.

That has to remind us of the year 1931, when the Education Establishment sprang its own alien on the country. With no testing, no proof of concept, no incremental introduction, and certainly no humility or shame, a small clique of education professors abolished common practice and, almost overnight, forced an alien method upon this country. Thus began the appropriation (that’s Commie euphemism for conquest) of the U.S. via illiteracy.

If you want to understand what we are up against when it comes to improving our schools, you have to reflect on how far a small group of ideologues will go to impose their destructive theories. Apparently, there’s no limit. Continue reading

Why We Desperately Need To Bring Back Vocational Training In Schools

Instructor helps a student participating in a woodworking manufacturing training program

Throughout most of U.S. history, American high school students were routinely taught vocational and job-ready skills along with the three Rs: reading, writing and arithmetic. Indeed readers of a certain age are likely to have fond memories of huddling over wooden workbenches learning a craft such as woodwork or maybe metal work, or any one of the hands-on projects that characterized the once-ubiquitous shop class.

But in the 1950s, a different philosophy emerged: the theory that students should follow separate educational tracks according to ability. The idea was that the college-bound would take traditional academic courses (Latin, creative writing, science, math) and received no vocational training. Those students not headed for college would take basic academic courses, along with vocational training, or “shop.” Continue reading

The Civil War: The Last Dying Gasp of Federalism in America

It was necessary to put the South at a moral disadvantage by transforming the contest from a war waged against states fighting for their independence into a war waged against states fighting for the maintenance and extension of slavery…and the world, it might be hoped, would see it as a moral war, not a political; and the sympathy of nations would begin to run for the North, not for the South.” ~ Woodrow Wilson, History of the American People, 1902

Adopted as the first flag of the Confederate States of America by the provisional congress on March 4, 1861, and despite its official use for over two years, this flag was never formally adopted by law because it was to be used in a flag-raising ceremony within two hours of being adopted and the congress neglected to enact a flag law. It was the original “Stars and Bars” and eventually grew to 13 stars.

How many of you remember back in grade school when they would give you a sentence with a blank in it, then provide you with choices to fill in the blank correctly? I want to try something similar, except I’ll never know how you answer. So fill in the following sentence with either “federal” or “national”: In the United States the __________ government is located in Washington, D.C.

I’m sure there were a few of you who thought to yourselves that this was a stupid exercise as they both mean the same thing. Well, that’s the entire point of this exercise, because they don’t mean the same thing.

Federalism refers to a system in which distinct sovereign entities form together in a confederation with power shared by the federal and State/local governments. Each has their own distinct spheres of operation in which they exercise jurisdiction and sovereignty.

In Federalist 45 James Madison declares our system to of a federal nature as follows, “The powers delegated by the proposed Constitution to the federal government, are few and defined. Those which are to remain in the State governments are numerous and indefinite. The former will be exercised principally on external objects, as war, peace, negotiation, and foreign commerce; with which last the power of taxation will, for the most part, be connected. The powers reserved to the several States will extend to all the objects which, in the ordinary course of affairs, concern the lives, liberties, and properties of the people, and the internal order, improvement, and prosperity of the State.”
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