Education a la Carte: Choosing the Best Schooling Options for Your Child – eBook

Every parent wants the best possible education for their child–one that fits their child’s unique needs, challenges them to grow, and equips them to succeed. But there are so many options–public, private, and charter schools, plus homeschooling and online schooling–that it’s easy for parents to feel overwhelmed and, well, undereducated about the choices. What’s more, while one schooling option may be right for one child, it may be challenging for another. And sometimes the same child will thrive in one environment in elementary school but falter in that same environment in middle school.

What’s a parent to do?
Parenting expert and longtime educator Dr. Kevin Leman can help. In this practical book, he clearly explains the pros and cons of various schooling options so that parents can make an informed choice about the kind of education that will help their child thrive. He shows parents how to stay involved and engaged with their child’s education every step of the way, knowing that the choices they make about school now will reverberate long into that child’s future. Order NOW

Congress Passes Psychological Manipulation in an Education Bill

Schools Become Mental Health Clinics

~ Foreword ~
With all the CRAP that is being taught in the public schools (and some private schools) I have to ask WHY any parent would continue to send their children to them. The insane subject matter – the sex fueled teachers who think their students are their sex toys – the pushing of this trans gender garbage – and the FAILURE to teach the basics like Reading, Writing, Arithmetic, Civics, – all the subjects that used to be the norm – have been taken over by the global/demonic indoctrinators. I stopped voting for all school levies in the mid 60’s when the Federal Way, WA public school teachers went on their ILLEGAL strike and they weren’t fired and sued for their ILLEGAL strike. I saw a change in the way my children were being taught and I refused to support any $$$ – granted few other parents understood what they were supporting so they voted yes on those extortion levies.

Split up the families to make it easier to train more protestors. ~ Jackie Juntti
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Is a Lawn Jockey Racist?

An owner tells us what it REALLY means

For a long time, lawn jockeys have adorned the front yards of American homes, but you may have noticed in recent decades that the number of them is fewer and fewer. Somewhere along the line, they started being touted as a symbol of racism. One woman says that she grew tired of people trying to ‘educate’ her about her lawn jockey, and of complaints that she needs to take it down. With a single social media post, the woman blew away her critics. Continue reading

Frederick Douglass, American

The following excerpt is adapted from a speech delivered at Hillsdale College on May 12, 2017, at the dedication of a statue of Frederick Douglass on the College’s Liberty Walk.

Frederick Douglas ` American

Frederick Douglass, a former slave and a leading abolitionist writer and orator, was the most photographed American of the 19th century. And as you at Hillsdale College know, one of the most famous photographs of Douglass was taken in this town, just a few weeks after President Lincoln issued his Emancipation Proclamation. At the invitation of a ladies literary society, Douglass came to Hillsdale and spoke in the College Chapel on January 21, 1863. The title of his lecture was “Popular Error and Unpopular Truth.” As reported in the newspaper, Douglass said: “There was no such thing as new truth. Error might be old or new; but truth was as old as the universe.” Continue reading

The Restaurant Without a Kitchen ~ A Parable About Education In America

My teaching bag of tricks is full of stories, lots of stories— biographies that are a window into history, stories to teach the alphabet, stories that break down the complexity of a math process and metaphoric stories such as parables and fables that spark thinking.

My students are used to stories that take them on a journey that appears to bring them far away from our main theme, into a tale that is not so much a segue as a secret route to the heart of the topic.

Stories can be especially effective when students are stuck, when a concept is difficult or complex, when the kids just don’t get it. At this moment in our culture we are collectively stuck when it comes to making decisions about the future of education. My perspective as a teacher is that most people just don’t get why standards and testing wastes the talent, inspiration and joy that our nations teachers are ready and able to bring to children while teaching them well. Continue reading

National Education: It Has Always Been About “Reconstructing” Southern Culture

                     John Chodes

In his book Segregation–Federal Policy or Racism (Shotwell Publishing, Columbia, South Carolina) author John Chodes noted, on page 53 that: “In 1867, a small agency was created by Congress. It was called the Bureau of Education. It consisted of only five employees: a supervisor and four clerks, ‘to collect such statistics and facts as shall show the condition and progress of education in the several states and territories…as shall aid the people of the United States in the establishment and maintenance of efficient school systems, and otherwise promote the cause of education throughout the country.

From this miniscule beginning, over time, the Bureau of Education became a gigantic department, nationalizing, controlling, and separating black and white primary and secondary schools by administering the Morrill colleges and absorbing the Freedmen’s Bureau schools into its own bureaucracy.”

We have all been led to believe that the federal Department of Education didn’t happen until Jimmy Carter brought it in during his one-term presidency as payback to the National Education Association for their support of him. Actually, it seems that all Carter did was to support the most recent manifestation of something that had really been around, in one form or another, for a very long time. Continue reading

Horatio Seymour: Libertarian Democrat

When New York Produced Giants for Liberty

“The idea pervades the bill that severe penalties will secure enforcement; but all experience shows that undue severity of laws defeats their execution … [N]o law can be sustained which goes beyond public feeling and sentiment. All experience shows that temperance, like other virtues, is not produced by lawmakers, but by the influences of education, morality and religion. Men may be persuaded — they cannot be compelled — to adopt habits of temperance.” ~ Horatio Seymour, 1854

This essay is about a long-forgotten New Yorker who served in his state’s legislature and twice as governor, then nearly became President of the United States. Much respected, even beloved by many in his day, his name was Horatio Seymour. He deserves to be dusted off and appreciated now, almost 130 years since his death. But first, some context.

The Democratic Party in the state of New York these days is about as “liberal” (in the twentieth-century, American sense of the term) as it gets. On economic issues in particular, it is reliably statist, meaning it rarely deviates from the “more government is the answer” mentality, no matter how strongly logic or evidence point elsewhere. But not so long ago, New York’s Democrats were largely of the opposite persuasion. They were often what we now would call “classical liberals,” ardent skeptics of the concentration of power. Classical liberals really believed in liberty; today’s liberals really don’t. Continue reading

New Poll Finds Most Americans Don’t Realize What School Is For

The 49th Annual PDK Poll of the Public’s Attitudes Toward Public School was released. It finds that those surveyed apparently don’t realize what school is for – education, not social services.

92 percent of Americans support after-school programs.

The Atlantic reports:

“When it comes to judging a school’s quality, what matters most? A new poll suggests the American public puts a premium on offerings outside of traditional academics, including career-focused education, developing students’ interpersonal skills, and providing after-school programs and mental-health care.”

Education reformers have been pushing career technical education (CTE) and social-emotional learning and now we have a poll that shows Americans are eating the crap sandwich with a smile. Continue reading

Comparing Constitutions

Southern leaders had few complaints with the old Constitution under which they had lived. The heart of the conflict, they felt, was that the intent of the written law had been subverted by Northern sectionalists.

Three major areas of conflict were over protective tariffs, the settlement of common territories, and the right to be secure in one’s property. Although tariffs enacted to foster industry had received initial approval from the South, Southerners came to be opposed to these measures as overly beneficial to Northern manufacturers and injurious to the agricultural South. The question of settlement and territorial administration was a particularly abrasive issue, as Northern states sought to stop the expansion of slavery into the territories and Southerners insisted on the right of persons to migrate into the territories with their property, including bound laborers. This was related to the third issue—security in property. Specifically, the properties in question were slaves, and Northern Abolitionists had already demonstrated their view on this matter in the halls of Congress, the prairies of Kansas, and Harpers Ferry, Virginia.

Various compromises and appeasements had held the Union together through past crises, but Abraham Lincoln’s election in November 1860 was the solvent that destroyed the glue. Seeking to form a new coalition of states, Southern representatives met as a provisional Congress in early February 1861 and a “Committee of Twelve” was appointed to draft a plan of government. Their work resulted in a provisional Constitution, and on March 11 a permanent Constitution was adopted. Continue reading

Bolshevik-Style Cultural Purge

Bolshevism where the “equality” utopia will reign supreme except for the elites who will continue to live their debauched and obscene lives

If I had a world of my own, everything would be nonsense. Nothing would be what it is, because everything would be what it isn’t. And contrary wise, what is, it wouldn’t be. And what it wouldn’t be, it would. You see? ~ Mad Hatter, character in Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

If you wondered about the deplorable state of American mis-education, all you have to do is look at the historical revisionist indoctrination in the textbooks, the classroom-forced Islamization of students, the Common Core standards that are dumbing down students across the board, and the Bolshevik-style cultural purge of Civil War monuments and heroes that are taking place around the country with the full approval and instigation from academia, the MSM, politicians, the current administration, and American citizens. Continue reading

Why Teachers Need Their Freedom

Educators must remain engaged and autonomous in order to do their jobs well and avoid burnout.

My co-teacher and I met in the parking lot before school and stared into my car trunk at the costumes and props we had gathered over the weekend. We were giddy with excitement and nervous because neither of us had tried anything like this before. We also taught in the kind of school where one wrong move in the classroom could lead to disastrous results because of our students’ intense behavioral and learning needs.

The co-teacher, Alice Gnau, had found a book called Teaching Content Outrageously by Stanley Pogrow, which explained how secondary classrooms can incorporate drama into any content to engage students in learning—incorporating the element of surprise, for example, or developing role-play or simulation experiences to teach content and standards. The book inspired us to change how we taught our seventh-grade language-arts students in a high-poverty school that struggled with test scores, especially reading and math. Continue reading

Feds Spend $138,000 Asking Four-Year-Olds About Their ‘Internal Sense Of Gender Identity

The Four ‘R’s?

(Photo TOBIAS SCHWARZ/AFP/Getty Images)

The National Science Foundation is spending over $130,000 on a study that asks four-year-olds about their “internal sense of gender identity.”

A grant for a two-year study was awarded to the University of Washington this summer. The project will interview 250 children aged four to six, and their parents, asking a series of questions about “gendered behavior.”

“Prominent theories of gender development have discussed the degree to which gender identity results from an internal sense of gender and socialization processes,” according to the grant. “However, tests of these theories have been limited because, for most children, internal gender identity and environmental socialization substantially overlap, rendering it impossible to distinguish the relative impact of each factor on gender development.” Continue reading

Panel Releases Proposal to Set U.S. Education Standards

AAAAw, Jeez – here we go again! How dumb can we go? Every time we touch the system – it goes further downhill – even though they promise it will make things better. The following post is from the archives of Kettle Moraine, Ltd – originally published on the Federal Observer, March 10, 2010. Tell me – what has changed? (Ed.)

A panel of educators convened by the nation’s governors and state school superintendents proposed a uniform set of academic standards on Wednesday, laying out their vision for what all the nation’s public school children should learn in math and English, year by year, from kindergarten to high school graduation.

The new proposals could transform American education, replacing the patchwork of standards ranging from mediocre to world-class that have been written by local educators in every state.

Under the proposed standards for English, for example, fifth graders would be expected to explain the differences between drama and prose, and to identify elements of drama like characters, dialogue and stage directions. Seventh graders would study, among other math concepts, proportional relationships, operations with rational numbers and solving linear equations.
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Schrock-Taylor: Let Teachers Tantrum … Then Fire Them

The following post is from the 2010 archives of Kettle Moraine Publishing (the Federal Observer). Although now retired, Linda Schrock-Taylor – is/was an extremely gifted and talented teacher and marvelous writer. Metropolis Café is proud to republish her work – for in the scheme of things – little has changed in the Public Fool System. ~ J.B.

When our son would tantrum – as all toddlers do at least once, we would calmly carry him to his room; explain that we did not want to see or hear such ugliness; and give him permission to rejoin us in the common areas of the home once he “finished.” Soon…then sooner…then soonest, he finished and the tantrum phase ended. Toddlers are much more sensible than many teachers. These public tantrums of public school teachers proves my point.

Unfortunately, the media is leading the way in giving attention to, and becoming too distraught over, badly behaving teachers. We cannot carry the teachers to their rooms let alone force them to actually teach but we can ignore them. Like toddlers, they should soon notice that no one is paying any attention to their fits and spurts. But on second thought…they have shown that they are not as sensible like toddlers. Continue reading

Government Destroys Education and Knowledge

Why does the government controlled education system keep trying to reinvent the knowledge wheel? The more they manipulate, the more distorted & unwieldy it becomes.

For Pete’s sake, some of the most esteemed educators in the history of the world taught in the 300’s B.C. Socrates set up a basis for learning by the use of hypothesis & questioning until a non-contradictory answer could be reached…a method used in science & law studies for centuries. Then there was Plato and his student Aristotle (the father of Reason & individuality) and his Lyceum (place of lectures & learning). How many students can even tell you who they were?

These efforts/achievements finally led to the Age of Enlightenment (e.g. John Locke), hence advancement in every field of endeavor, through the Industrial Revolution which lifted the standard of living for the masses within its sphere. Continue reading

Caruba: A Failing Grade for America’s Educational System

Editor’s NOTE: The following column by Alan Caruba was originally posted by Kettle Moraine, Ltd. Publications in March, 2012. Alan’s words are as direct and point-on as they were so many years ago. The late author’s referenced series, was published in it’s entirety on the Federal Observer, when it was but six weeks old. ~ J.B.

Back in 2001 I wrote a four-part series on The Subversion of Education in America and more than a decade later not much has improved. The causes are easily identified. One is federal control and the other is the National Education Association (NEA) which, despite its name, is a union.

Governor Chris Christie of New Jersey became a nationally known figure when he took on the teacher’s union for the way contracts with generous pension and health benefits were bankrupting the State. Other civil service contracts also came under review for the same reason.  Continue reading

Education Is “Reconstruction” ~ Even Today!

In his informative book Segregation–Federal Policy or Racism, author John Chodes has some interesting information in chapter 6, which he entitles The Freedmen’s Bureau: Segregation for Black Education. In this chapter he notes that the whole concept of segregation was promoted so that blacks could be “educated” (radicalized) separately from whites. This was a kind of master plan to promote class hatred between the races. Look at it this way–one of the reasons for the War of Northern Aggression was not to free the slaves, but rather to transfer ownership from private hands to federal hands. From private hands to the Freedmen’s Bureau!

Chodes notes how the federal government was, even in the 1860s, messing around with federal control of and aid for education. The foolish idea of public, or government, schools being “ours” or somehow belonging to the people, is and has been the prevalent myth, propagated on the public at large so they will not realize that this leviathan institution was made and directed from Washington from day one. This is something we have got to get through our heads! These really were and are Government Schools!
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